What do you do when you are no longer the “focus” of your church’s programming

Biblehands What do you do when years down the road everything about your church that once taught you, took care of your kids, and walked with you through the torrent of mid-life seems to leave you feeling like you are on another planet.  After all, you paid for the building, served in the youth group and were loyal during some hard times your church went through.  Now it seems like your church is on another planet.  The music is too loud, the focus is all on these younger families, your building is no longer new and appreciated.  And, you just do not feel “fed” by your church like you once did.

Every ministry has to make choices in who it is going to reach with programming, which is limited by physics and resources.  It seems to me that the most biblical thing is to favor those uninitiated as Christians.  In other words, favoring those who do not go to church or who are new on their Christian journey makes for a distinct and biblical strategy.  The more mature a person becomes in their faith the more tools they have to feed themselves and the more they do not need the church programs to hold their hand.   So, it is those of us who are further along who need to reach to the newbies rather than feeling like we are entitled since we did our time in children’s ministry 23 years ago.

What this looks like in reality is a church worship environment that might actually be more comfortable for someone who is a new Christian than for a believer who has walked with God for 30 years.  It may mean turning up the volume, dressing down the pastor, de-churching the language, and providing something for kids.  After all, those under 50 are most likely not to go to church and they are most likely to have kids.  So, if your target is unchurched people you had better think of kids.  So, what happens to me when I pass this point in life?

Someday I am going to be an “older saint” and I hope that I am not cantankerous about the changes.  Really, I would rather people not have to go through the pain of learning new worship music and style every five years.  In fact, I think the “contemporary” music thing is not the issue.  It is really that change has not been led well in many cases and people have not been valued.  Sure, there is an actual culture of self-centered older saints, but I have known many who resist filling out nasty comment cards about worship and who “endure” the worship music when it really does not hit them where they live.  If you are in a church that is less than 10-15 years old that has always been contemporary or edgy, you have no idea what I am talking about.  If you live in a community that has few older people, you have no idea what I am talking about.  Just give it time.  Your turn is coming.

It would be easy to disregard the older generation if it were not the case that this might be one of the largest mission fields out there.  Are we missing something here?  I have launched a “traditional” service once and my experience tells me that this type of service had less evangelistic results compared to the other services we launched in a multi-venue setting.  However, demographics make it clear that if we do not address the stages after mid-life that we may be losing out on more than our mission.  Paul went around collecting money for Christians who were impoverished.  This being said, the reality is that I have not observed much fruit from these types endeavors.

Here are some thoughts I am wrestling with right now:

  • Our culture is a moving target while some of our own people’s needs are for stability to counterbalance this reality.  We need to acknowledge how hard this really is on everyone.
  • Meeting the felt needs of new people means that unless you quickly ween them, your entire church will feel entitled for their felt needs to be addressed.
  • To be inclusive of new Christians in our church means we have to be willing to start over and reinvent ourselves to stay relevant.  Is my small group of friends really friendly to strangers?
  • Change is always hard.  Learning to lead people through the human process of transition is a must to succeed in today’s church.
  • When you reach one group, it is likely another group is not feeling reached.  When the temperature in the room is just right for one, it is awful for another.  Resist the temptation to “blend” or to compromise. A tepid room would make both unhappy.
  • Reaching the older generation, which is becoming huge, has to be addressed sooner rather than later.  Am I willing and equipped to tackle this?
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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

56 comments

  1. A tepid room does frustrate everyone. Gearing a “service” towards a specific demographic is effective, maybe the best way… I dunno.
    But regardless of the demographic, I think it’s critical to connect people with other people. We should show people that church isn’t a service with electric guitars and imag, it’s people.

    Home teams/small groups is where the church is. Serving others is where the church is.

    Most often, “church” is the weekend service… even at churches with home teams/small groups. If we look at the weekend service as “church,” then naturally we’re asking what’s in it for us. Did it speak to me? Did I like the music? If we see “church” as a way to reach people and grow, then we’ll ask, “how I can help others?” “How can I serve God as I’m called to do”

    I would also not worry about “felt needs.” We know that new people need Christ, need to know how to follow Him, and need to connect with other believers.

    I also agree with your urgency about the older generation. It’s widely untapped mission field.

    Let’s show people that the church isn’t about us, it’s about Him and prospering His kingdom.

    Great post, Rich. Thanks for sharing.

  2. A tepid room does frustrate everyone. Gearing a “service” towards a specific demographic is effective, maybe the best way… I dunno.
    But regardless of the demographic, I think it’s critical to connect people with other people. We should show people that church isn’t a service with electric guitars and imag, it’s people.

    Home teams/small groups is where the church is. Serving others is where the church is.

    Most often, “church” is the weekend service… even at churches with home teams/small groups. If we look at the weekend service as “church,” then naturally we’re asking what’s in it for us. Did it speak to me? Did I like the music? If we see “church” as a way to reach people and grow, then we’ll ask, “how I can help others?” “How can I serve God as I’m called to do”

    I would also not worry about “felt needs.” We know that new people need Christ, need to know how to follow Him, and need to connect with other believers.

    I also agree with your urgency about the older generation. It’s widely untapped mission field.

    Let’s show people that the church isn’t about us, it’s about Him and prospering His kingdom.

    Great post, Rich. Thanks for sharing.

  3. A tepid room does frustrate everyone. Gearing a “service” towards a specific demographic is effective, maybe the best way… I dunno.
    But regardless of the demographic, I think it’s critical to connect people with other people. We should show people that church isn’t a service with electric guitars and imag, it’s people.

    Home teams/small groups is where the church is. Serving others is where the church is.

    Most often, “church” is the weekend service… even at churches with home teams/small groups. If we look at the weekend service as “church,” then naturally we’re asking what’s in it for us. Did it speak to me? Did I like the music? If we see “church” as a way to reach people and grow, then we’ll ask, “how I can help others?” “How can I serve God as I’m called to do”

    I would also not worry about “felt needs.” We know that new people need Christ, need to know how to follow Him, and need to connect with other believers.

    I also agree with your urgency about the older generation. It’s widely untapped mission field.

    Let’s show people that the church isn’t about us, it’s about Him and prospering His kingdom.

    Great post, Rich. Thanks for sharing.

  4. A tepid room does frustrate everyone. Gearing a “service” towards a specific demographic is effective, maybe the best way… I dunno.
    But regardless of the demographic, I think it’s critical to connect people with other people. We should show people that church isn’t a service with electric guitars and imag, it’s people.

    Home teams/small groups is where the church is. Serving others is where the church is.

    Most often, “church” is the weekend service… even at churches with home teams/small groups. If we look at the weekend service as “church,” then naturally we’re asking what’s in it for us. Did it speak to me? Did I like the music? If we see “church” as a way to reach people and grow, then we’ll ask, “how I can help others?” “How can I serve God as I’m called to do”

    I would also not worry about “felt needs.” We know that new people need Christ, need to know how to follow Him, and need to connect with other believers.

    I also agree with your urgency about the older generation. It’s widely untapped mission field.

    Let’s show people that the church isn’t about us, it’s about Him and prospering His kingdom.

    Great post, Rich. Thanks for sharing.

  5. Hi Derek,
    I am assuming that what I am saying goes well beyond a worship service, so I hope that point is clear. Essentially, a church that targets young families may not have much for older people, period. The worship service is just one item that we can all identify with.

    As far as felt needs, I might need to define for you what is really meant by “felt need”. If you ignore these you will not be able to evangelize very effectively, I think. Hence, “I become all things to all men” is what this is. Using contemporary music, is meeting felt need. Having chairs that are decent to sit on in a worship service. Offering kids ministry to reach the parents is meeting a felt need. This is how we reach into people, whether through a soup kitchen or rock music, but once they move from being beginners they need to become contributors. Learning to see church as not an institution for me but for others who are not as far as I am is tough. That is the point I am making with felt needs.

  6. Hi Derek,
    I am assuming that what I am saying goes well beyond a worship service, so I hope that point is clear. Essentially, a church that targets young families may not have much for older people, period. The worship service is just one item that we can all identify with.

    As far as felt needs, I might need to define for you what is really meant by “felt need”. If you ignore these you will not be able to evangelize very effectively, I think. Hence, “I become all things to all men” is what this is. Using contemporary music, is meeting felt need. Having chairs that are decent to sit on in a worship service. Offering kids ministry to reach the parents is meeting a felt need. This is how we reach into people, whether through a soup kitchen or rock music, but once they move from being beginners they need to become contributors. Learning to see church as not an institution for me but for others who are not as far as I am is tough. That is the point I am making with felt needs.

  7. Hi Derek,
    I am assuming that what I am saying goes well beyond a worship service, so I hope that point is clear. Essentially, a church that targets young families may not have much for older people, period. The worship service is just one item that we can all identify with.

    As far as felt needs, I might need to define for you what is really meant by “felt need”. If you ignore these you will not be able to evangelize very effectively, I think. Hence, “I become all things to all men” is what this is. Using contemporary music, is meeting felt need. Having chairs that are decent to sit on in a worship service. Offering kids ministry to reach the parents is meeting a felt need. This is how we reach into people, whether through a soup kitchen or rock music, but once they move from being beginners they need to become contributors. Learning to see church as not an institution for me but for others who are not as far as I am is tough. That is the point I am making with felt needs.

  8. Hi Derek,
    I am assuming that what I am saying goes well beyond a worship service, so I hope that point is clear. Essentially, a church that targets young families may not have much for older people, period. The worship service is just one item that we can all identify with.

    As far as felt needs, I might need to define for you what is really meant by “felt need”. If you ignore these you will not be able to evangelize very effectively, I think. Hence, “I become all things to all men” is what this is. Using contemporary music, is meeting felt need. Having chairs that are decent to sit on in a worship service. Offering kids ministry to reach the parents is meeting a felt need. This is how we reach into people, whether through a soup kitchen or rock music, but once they move from being beginners they need to become contributors. Learning to see church as not an institution for me but for others who are not as far as I am is tough. That is the point I am making with felt needs.

  9. Dude. this is going down as one of your best posts…ever. It was awesome. Thanks for taking time to honestly address this issue.

  10. Dude. this is going down as one of your best posts…ever. It was awesome. Thanks for taking time to honestly address this issue.

  11. Dude. this is going down as one of your best posts…ever. It was awesome. Thanks for taking time to honestly address this issue.

  12. Dude. this is going down as one of your best posts…ever. It was awesome. Thanks for taking time to honestly address this issue.

  13. Brilliant post,really it was. I liked how you addressed culture as a moving target – wobbling about like the magnetic north pole. And you really showed deep thought in addressing the compromise in reaching some people. If you tailor things for the new Christians inevitably you’ll bore those who’ve heard the gospel more than 45 times. And if you’re an old veteran you’ll just find a new church.
    What’s more is that if you tailor it to the old veterans you’ll completely alienate the idea of new christians and utterly confuse the mid-rangey people. The best (or worst) of both worlds is to have a church with a broad focus that reaches the middle ground because things will tend to sway what topics are preached in church one way or the other. Some messages will be for the newbies and some (like what we’re doing in Romans now, cause it’s a magnominously chunky book) will fit the veterans. And that’s about as simple as walking with a dead elephant on your back.
    Fabulous post though,

  14. Brilliant post,really it was. I liked how you addressed culture as a moving target – wobbling about like the magnetic north pole. And you really showed deep thought in addressing the compromise in reaching some people. If you tailor things for the new Christians inevitably you’ll bore those who’ve heard the gospel more than 45 times. And if you’re an old veteran you’ll just find a new church.
    What’s more is that if you tailor it to the old veterans you’ll completely alienate the idea of new christians and utterly confuse the mid-rangey people. The best (or worst) of both worlds is to have a church with a broad focus that reaches the middle ground because things will tend to sway what topics are preached in church one way or the other. Some messages will be for the newbies and some (like what we’re doing in Romans now, cause it’s a magnominously chunky book) will fit the veterans. And that’s about as simple as walking with a dead elephant on your back.
    Fabulous post though,

  15. Brilliant post,really it was. I liked how you addressed culture as a moving target – wobbling about like the magnetic north pole. And you really showed deep thought in addressing the compromise in reaching some people. If you tailor things for the new Christians inevitably you’ll bore those who’ve heard the gospel more than 45 times. And if you’re an old veteran you’ll just find a new church.
    What’s more is that if you tailor it to the old veterans you’ll completely alienate the idea of new christians and utterly confuse the mid-rangey people. The best (or worst) of both worlds is to have a church with a broad focus that reaches the middle ground because things will tend to sway what topics are preached in church one way or the other. Some messages will be for the newbies and some (like what we’re doing in Romans now, cause it’s a magnominously chunky book) will fit the veterans. And that’s about as simple as walking with a dead elephant on your back.
    Fabulous post though,

  16. Brilliant post,really it was. I liked how you addressed culture as a moving target – wobbling about like the magnetic north pole. And you really showed deep thought in addressing the compromise in reaching some people. If you tailor things for the new Christians inevitably you’ll bore those who’ve heard the gospel more than 45 times. And if you’re an old veteran you’ll just find a new church.
    What’s more is that if you tailor it to the old veterans you’ll completely alienate the idea of new christians and utterly confuse the mid-rangey people. The best (or worst) of both worlds is to have a church with a broad focus that reaches the middle ground because things will tend to sway what topics are preached in church one way or the other. Some messages will be for the newbies and some (like what we’re doing in Romans now, cause it’s a magnominously chunky book) will fit the veterans. And that’s about as simple as walking with a dead elephant on your back.
    Fabulous post though,

  17. Great thoughts, Rich. I think often of how I’m going to be as I get older. I’m praying that I’ll sweeten and won’t sour!
    Our church is established, and multi-generational, and musically, we don’t often tickle the fancy of our older members. I try to keep us in touch with classic hymnody, but it doesn’t always work. A couple weeks ago we did “Since Jesus Came Into My Heart” in late service. I prob had 25% of the congregation singing. The rest didn’t know it, get it, or care.

    Change is hard. I’m 37, and I notice that it’s gradually getting harder for me.

    Thanks for thinking deeply.

  18. Great thoughts, Rich. I think often of how I’m going to be as I get older. I’m praying that I’ll sweeten and won’t sour!
    Our church is established, and multi-generational, and musically, we don’t often tickle the fancy of our older members. I try to keep us in touch with classic hymnody, but it doesn’t always work. A couple weeks ago we did “Since Jesus Came Into My Heart” in late service. I prob had 25% of the congregation singing. The rest didn’t know it, get it, or care.

    Change is hard. I’m 37, and I notice that it’s gradually getting harder for me.

    Thanks for thinking deeply.

  19. Great thoughts, Rich. I think often of how I’m going to be as I get older. I’m praying that I’ll sweeten and won’t sour!
    Our church is established, and multi-generational, and musically, we don’t often tickle the fancy of our older members. I try to keep us in touch with classic hymnody, but it doesn’t always work. A couple weeks ago we did “Since Jesus Came Into My Heart” in late service. I prob had 25% of the congregation singing. The rest didn’t know it, get it, or care.

    Change is hard. I’m 37, and I notice that it’s gradually getting harder for me.

    Thanks for thinking deeply.

  20. Great thoughts, Rich. I think often of how I’m going to be as I get older. I’m praying that I’ll sweeten and won’t sour!
    Our church is established, and multi-generational, and musically, we don’t often tickle the fancy of our older members. I try to keep us in touch with classic hymnody, but it doesn’t always work. A couple weeks ago we did “Since Jesus Came Into My Heart” in late service. I prob had 25% of the congregation singing. The rest didn’t know it, get it, or care.

    Change is hard. I’m 37, and I notice that it’s gradually getting harder for me.

    Thanks for thinking deeply.

  21. Well, what does the Bible have to say about it?
    We’re commanded to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. If we look at the practice of God’s people through the ages, they have always sung both new and old songs to God. Those living in David’s day would have sung Psalm 90, a psalm written by Moses. That’s a pretty old song! Since Paul commands the singing of psalms, I assume that even the Gentile church thought it normative to sing from the psalter. A believer could count on singing songs that date back to the very beginning of the covenant. When we sing the psalms, we are singing them with the millions who have gone before us.

    The command to sing a new song seems to be fulfilled a bit more easily today, but I’m not sure our songs really match their biblical counterparts. The psalms seem a little scary to our soft society. The NT writers weren’t afraid of them, though.

    The NT writers did everything in their power to affirm that young and old, rich and poor, Jew and Greek, single and married all form one body that should not be divided. I have a feeling that the divisions that the Corinthians experienced (I Cor. 11) were a result of the “felt needs” of the rich trumping the real needs of the poor.

    Felt needs, pheh.

    Good for you for thinking all of this through.

  22. Well, what does the Bible have to say about it?
    We’re commanded to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. If we look at the practice of God’s people through the ages, they have always sung both new and old songs to God. Those living in David’s day would have sung Psalm 90, a psalm written by Moses. That’s a pretty old song! Since Paul commands the singing of psalms, I assume that even the Gentile church thought it normative to sing from the psalter. A believer could count on singing songs that date back to the very beginning of the covenant. When we sing the psalms, we are singing them with the millions who have gone before us.

    The command to sing a new song seems to be fulfilled a bit more easily today, but I’m not sure our songs really match their biblical counterparts. The psalms seem a little scary to our soft society. The NT writers weren’t afraid of them, though.

    The NT writers did everything in their power to affirm that young and old, rich and poor, Jew and Greek, single and married all form one body that should not be divided. I have a feeling that the divisions that the Corinthians experienced (I Cor. 11) were a result of the “felt needs” of the rich trumping the real needs of the poor.

    Felt needs, pheh.

    Good for you for thinking all of this through.

  23. Well, what does the Bible have to say about it?
    We’re commanded to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. If we look at the practice of God’s people through the ages, they have always sung both new and old songs to God. Those living in David’s day would have sung Psalm 90, a psalm written by Moses. That’s a pretty old song! Since Paul commands the singing of psalms, I assume that even the Gentile church thought it normative to sing from the psalter. A believer could count on singing songs that date back to the very beginning of the covenant. When we sing the psalms, we are singing them with the millions who have gone before us.

    The command to sing a new song seems to be fulfilled a bit more easily today, but I’m not sure our songs really match their biblical counterparts. The psalms seem a little scary to our soft society. The NT writers weren’t afraid of them, though.

    The NT writers did everything in their power to affirm that young and old, rich and poor, Jew and Greek, single and married all form one body that should not be divided. I have a feeling that the divisions that the Corinthians experienced (I Cor. 11) were a result of the “felt needs” of the rich trumping the real needs of the poor.

    Felt needs, pheh.

    Good for you for thinking all of this through.

  24. Well, what does the Bible have to say about it?
    We’re commanded to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. If we look at the practice of God’s people through the ages, they have always sung both new and old songs to God. Those living in David’s day would have sung Psalm 90, a psalm written by Moses. That’s a pretty old song! Since Paul commands the singing of psalms, I assume that even the Gentile church thought it normative to sing from the psalter. A believer could count on singing songs that date back to the very beginning of the covenant. When we sing the psalms, we are singing them with the millions who have gone before us.

    The command to sing a new song seems to be fulfilled a bit more easily today, but I’m not sure our songs really match their biblical counterparts. The psalms seem a little scary to our soft society. The NT writers weren’t afraid of them, though.

    The NT writers did everything in their power to affirm that young and old, rich and poor, Jew and Greek, single and married all form one body that should not be divided. I have a feeling that the divisions that the Corinthians experienced (I Cor. 11) were a result of the “felt needs” of the rich trumping the real needs of the poor.

    Felt needs, pheh.

    Good for you for thinking all of this through.

  25. I’ve struggled with the idea that we are trying to accomadate to many areas, but I am starting to get on board with it. I figure as long as I’m serving at this church I need to go in line with the vision of the church. Currently, in one service, we are trying to reach six different areas: african american, latin, asian, caucasian, tradidtional, and contemporary. I suppose I need to be more than just contemporary and be all things to all people.

  26. I’ve struggled with the idea that we are trying to accomadate to many areas, but I am starting to get on board with it. I figure as long as I’m serving at this church I need to go in line with the vision of the church. Currently, in one service, we are trying to reach six different areas: african american, latin, asian, caucasian, tradidtional, and contemporary. I suppose I need to be more than just contemporary and be all things to all people.

  27. I’ve struggled with the idea that we are trying to accomadate to many areas, but I am starting to get on board with it. I figure as long as I’m serving at this church I need to go in line with the vision of the church. Currently, in one service, we are trying to reach six different areas: african american, latin, asian, caucasian, tradidtional, and contemporary. I suppose I need to be more than just contemporary and be all things to all people.

  28. I’ve struggled with the idea that we are trying to accomadate to many areas, but I am starting to get on board with it. I figure as long as I’m serving at this church I need to go in line with the vision of the church. Currently, in one service, we are trying to reach six different areas: african american, latin, asian, caucasian, tradidtional, and contemporary. I suppose I need to be more than just contemporary and be all things to all people.

  29. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  30. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  31. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  32. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  33. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  34. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  35. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  36. Wow, it’s funny we had a conversation about this exact thing at our elder meeting this morning I am going to send them the link to this blog right now . . . it’ll convince them I’m right . . . ok just kidding they want to head this way as well.

  37. thanks Rich for your thoughtful comments and questions on this subject. I love it when the dear saints in our fellowship 1) understand the need to serve (without creating that sense of entitlement in the newbies you talked about!) those who are entering the church for the first time (or first time in a long time!); and 2) are able to dialogue with me about these frustrations in a healthy, non-divisive manner. that is a blessing! Your discussion on this subject helps make the issue real without being divisive, as has been the case in so many places! thanks again!

  38. thanks Rich for your thoughtful comments and questions on this subject. I love it when the dear saints in our fellowship 1) understand the need to serve (without creating that sense of entitlement in the newbies you talked about!) those who are entering the church for the first time (or first time in a long time!); and 2) are able to dialogue with me about these frustrations in a healthy, non-divisive manner. that is a blessing! Your discussion on this subject helps make the issue real without being divisive, as has been the case in so many places! thanks again!

  39. thanks Rich for your thoughtful comments and questions on this subject. I love it when the dear saints in our fellowship 1) understand the need to serve (without creating that sense of entitlement in the newbies you talked about!) those who are entering the church for the first time (or first time in a long time!); and 2) are able to dialogue with me about these frustrations in a healthy, non-divisive manner. that is a blessing! Your discussion on this subject helps make the issue real without being divisive, as has been the case in so many places! thanks again!

  40. thanks Rich for your thoughtful comments and questions on this subject. I love it when the dear saints in our fellowship 1) understand the need to serve (without creating that sense of entitlement in the newbies you talked about!) those who are entering the church for the first time (or first time in a long time!); and 2) are able to dialogue with me about these frustrations in a healthy, non-divisive manner. that is a blessing! Your discussion on this subject helps make the issue real without being divisive, as has been the case in so many places! thanks again!

  41. Rich, I’ve had this starred in my Google Reader for quite a while now. I hadn’t ever thought about this before: What’s going to happen when my generation’s idea of doing church is pushed aside?
    But the main reason why I wanted to save this one and comment on it later is this: I’ve been impressed with the growth you’ve shown as a musician, as a follower of Christ, and as a pastor. It’s been cool to follow that on your blog and the times we’ve been able to chat via messenger. This is good stuff.

  42. Rich, I’ve had this starred in my Google Reader for quite a while now. I hadn’t ever thought about this before: What’s going to happen when my generation’s idea of doing church is pushed aside?
    But the main reason why I wanted to save this one and comment on it later is this: I’ve been impressed with the growth you’ve shown as a musician, as a follower of Christ, and as a pastor. It’s been cool to follow that on your blog and the times we’ve been able to chat via messenger. This is good stuff.

  43. Rich, I’ve had this starred in my Google Reader for quite a while now. I hadn’t ever thought about this before: What’s going to happen when my generation’s idea of doing church is pushed aside?
    But the main reason why I wanted to save this one and comment on it later is this: I’ve been impressed with the growth you’ve shown as a musician, as a follower of Christ, and as a pastor. It’s been cool to follow that on your blog and the times we’ve been able to chat via messenger. This is good stuff.

  44. Rich, I’ve had this starred in my Google Reader for quite a while now. I hadn’t ever thought about this before: What’s going to happen when my generation’s idea of doing church is pushed aside?
    But the main reason why I wanted to save this one and comment on it later is this: I’ve been impressed with the growth you’ve shown as a musician, as a follower of Christ, and as a pastor. It’s been cool to follow that on your blog and the times we’ve been able to chat via messenger. This is good stuff.

  45. Awesome Post. The pendulum continues to swing and generations continue to redefine themselves. When will we realize that worship is not for us but for Him.

  46. Awesome Post. The pendulum continues to swing and generations continue to redefine themselves. When will we realize that worship is not for us but for Him.

  47. Awesome Post. The pendulum continues to swing and generations continue to redefine themselves. When will we realize that worship is not for us but for Him.

  48. Awesome Post. The pendulum continues to swing and generations continue to redefine themselves. When will we realize that worship is not for us but for Him.

  49. Rich,
    I liked your article so much that I wrote about it as well, referencing your post. Well thought out. Very intuitive and objective.

    Brandi

  50. Rich,
    I liked your article so much that I wrote about it as well, referencing your post. Well thought out. Very intuitive and objective.

    Brandi

  51. Rich,
    I liked your article so much that I wrote about it as well, referencing your post. Well thought out. Very intuitive and objective.

    Brandi

  52. Rich,
    I liked your article so much that I wrote about it as well, referencing your post. Well thought out. Very intuitive and objective.

    Brandi

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