Jukebox: “Son, this is how big iPods used to be in the past”

Jukebox

I had to tell my son, Ethan, that this is what iPod’s used to look like.  We had a blast playing this thing over the holidays.  My in-laws love old music and gifted us one of my favorite items in our home:  a 1900s Brunswick 78 record player that truly plays when you crank it up. 

The jukebox is a great analogy to how times have changed.  We have always been about making choices here in America.  With the jukebox, you had to take turns and everyone else had to live with your choice.  You were loved for choosing well and hated for picking the wrong side of the 45.  With the iPod, you make the choice.  The music you listen to might suck terribly, but you might never be bothered by others with that fact.  You can download a song from iTunes (hopefully one of mine!) and go. 

It used to be that the family watched TV together.  We do.  But, only one program, American Idol.  My kids have stations and shows they watch.  My wife has Lifetime Network.  I have Fox News and the History Channel. (I admit to being a fanatic of 24).  We have video games we play together, but my kids can go to their Gameboys and disappear while my wife and I are on separate computers paying bills, blogging, and even shopping.  Don’t even start when it comes to diet.  While I have eggs over easy, my kids are chomping on Poptarts.

What is better?  I think the jukebox is cool, but the iPod can hold a warehouse full of jukeboxes.

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

12 comments

  1. I was going to say that maybe we’ve lost our sense of community by unplugging the jukebox and plugging in our iPods, but then that wouldn’t be the case, either. It’s just a different type of community, one that transcends geographical barriers. Instead of meeting down at the malt shop to hear what everybody else is listening to, we’re meeting at Starbucks via wi-fi to find out the same thing.
    Great post, Rich.

  2. I was going to say that maybe we’ve lost our sense of community by unplugging the jukebox and plugging in our iPods, but then that wouldn’t be the case, either. It’s just a different type of community, one that transcends geographical barriers. Instead of meeting down at the malt shop to hear what everybody else is listening to, we’re meeting at Starbucks via wi-fi to find out the same thing.
    Great post, Rich.

  3. I was going to say that maybe we’ve lost our sense of community by unplugging the jukebox and plugging in our iPods, but then that wouldn’t be the case, either. It’s just a different type of community, one that transcends geographical barriers. Instead of meeting down at the malt shop to hear what everybody else is listening to, we’re meeting at Starbucks via wi-fi to find out the same thing.
    Great post, Rich.

  4. I was going to say that maybe we’ve lost our sense of community by unplugging the jukebox and plugging in our iPods, but then that wouldn’t be the case, either. It’s just a different type of community, one that transcends geographical barriers. Instead of meeting down at the malt shop to hear what everybody else is listening to, we’re meeting at Starbucks via wi-fi to find out the same thing.
    Great post, Rich.

  5. Rick…
    …I think that technology can be used to promote community, however, I have to differ with you and the notion of a “transcendant” community that goes beyond mere physical proximity.

    I know too many people who use “online community” to prevent anyone from knowing anything about themselves. I don’t think you can really have relationship with someone who doesn’t see how you react to the relational-toe-stubs that come from day to day living together.

    As much as men like Dallas Willard have influenced me, or even, as much as I have built a deep sense of brotherhood with men from other parts of the country, those who are truly close to me have all shared the intense emotional experiences AND the mundane experiences of simply living together.

    …of course, perhaps I am simply reading into your comment what wasn’t there…

  6. Rick…
    …I think that technology can be used to promote community, however, I have to differ with you and the notion of a “transcendant” community that goes beyond mere physical proximity.

    I know too many people who use “online community” to prevent anyone from knowing anything about themselves. I don’t think you can really have relationship with someone who doesn’t see how you react to the relational-toe-stubs that come from day to day living together.

    As much as men like Dallas Willard have influenced me, or even, as much as I have built a deep sense of brotherhood with men from other parts of the country, those who are truly close to me have all shared the intense emotional experiences AND the mundane experiences of simply living together.

    …of course, perhaps I am simply reading into your comment what wasn’t there…

  7. Rick…
    …I think that technology can be used to promote community, however, I have to differ with you and the notion of a “transcendant” community that goes beyond mere physical proximity.

    I know too many people who use “online community” to prevent anyone from knowing anything about themselves. I don’t think you can really have relationship with someone who doesn’t see how you react to the relational-toe-stubs that come from day to day living together.

    As much as men like Dallas Willard have influenced me, or even, as much as I have built a deep sense of brotherhood with men from other parts of the country, those who are truly close to me have all shared the intense emotional experiences AND the mundane experiences of simply living together.

    …of course, perhaps I am simply reading into your comment what wasn’t there…

  8. Rick…
    …I think that technology can be used to promote community, however, I have to differ with you and the notion of a “transcendant” community that goes beyond mere physical proximity.

    I know too many people who use “online community” to prevent anyone from knowing anything about themselves. I don’t think you can really have relationship with someone who doesn’t see how you react to the relational-toe-stubs that come from day to day living together.

    As much as men like Dallas Willard have influenced me, or even, as much as I have built a deep sense of brotherhood with men from other parts of the country, those who are truly close to me have all shared the intense emotional experiences AND the mundane experiences of simply living together.

    …of course, perhaps I am simply reading into your comment what wasn’t there…

  9. Thanks for your comment back, Steven. By using the term “different” community, I was intentionally trying to not place a value (better or worse) on it. At the end of the day, music brings us together. And you’re right: Relationship building online can be used to the detriment of building face-to-face relationships.
    Rich, thanks for letting us hijack your blog here. 🙂

  10. Thanks for your comment back, Steven. By using the term “different” community, I was intentionally trying to not place a value (better or worse) on it. At the end of the day, music brings us together. And you’re right: Relationship building online can be used to the detriment of building face-to-face relationships.
    Rich, thanks for letting us hijack your blog here. 🙂

  11. Thanks for your comment back, Steven. By using the term “different” community, I was intentionally trying to not place a value (better or worse) on it. At the end of the day, music brings us together. And you’re right: Relationship building online can be used to the detriment of building face-to-face relationships.
    Rich, thanks for letting us hijack your blog here. 🙂

  12. Thanks for your comment back, Steven. By using the term “different” community, I was intentionally trying to not place a value (better or worse) on it. At the end of the day, music brings us together. And you’re right: Relationship building online can be used to the detriment of building face-to-face relationships.
    Rich, thanks for letting us hijack your blog here. 🙂

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