Drummer in a cage

Drummer

Nate, seen here with the awesome red hair playing away on a drum kit, gets to sit in a cage a couple times a month when he plays drums for our church services.  The drum cage is an interesting thing.  What is it that scares church ladies the most?  A church drummer out of control.  So, we put the drums in a cage. The audio engineer is also a bit miffed by too much stage volume, so we put the drums in a cage.  The vocal team wants to hear nothing but themselves on stage, so we put the drums in a cage.  You go to a church worship seminar, they have a drummer in a cage.  You can’t win if you are the drummer.  You have to wear ear plugs since the volume inside the cage is unbearable.  You sweat because no one really thought of ventilation.  (OK, so we put a fan in there).  There is only one thing that makes the drummer love the cage…the threat that we will bring back the electronic drum set!!

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

20 comments

  1. That’s too funny. I remember a comedian named Brad Stine coming to our church. He’s doing his bit then looks behind him on the stage. “Wow, nice B3… what the… what the heck is that? How bad does your drummer suck that you have to put him in the pope mobile?”

  2. That’s too funny. I remember a comedian named Brad Stine coming to our church. He’s doing his bit then looks behind him on the stage. “Wow, nice B3… what the… what the heck is that? How bad does your drummer suck that you have to put him in the pope mobile?”

  3. That’s too funny. I remember a comedian named Brad Stine coming to our church. He’s doing his bit then looks behind him on the stage. “Wow, nice B3… what the… what the heck is that? How bad does your drummer suck that you have to put him in the pope mobile?”

  4. That’s too funny. I remember a comedian named Brad Stine coming to our church. He’s doing his bit then looks behind him on the stage. “Wow, nice B3… what the… what the heck is that? How bad does your drummer suck that you have to put him in the pope mobile?”

  5. Thankfully, I don’t have to play in a cage. You’ve got other, more serious acoustical issues if you have to put your drummer in a plexiglass room all by himself.
    My main kit at home is an expanded set of Roland V-Customs and I have to ask what’s so bad about them? When played right and configured correctly, they sound fabulous. The dynamic range is there and everything. The “Rosewood” kit selection sounds marvelous when configured with the small theater setting.

    My other kit is a standard early Seventies-era Ludwig three toms and a kick, plus an ancient Slingerland snare in chromed steel (love that snare). Ludwig silver dots on the toms, Remo Emperor batters on the snare and kick. ProMark 747 and 707 sticks, both nylon-tipped.

    At church I play a plain vanilla set of Pearl Exports. And though there’s a fairly nice DW pedal on them, I choose my 40-year-old Pearl pedal–built like a tank and made for a real man’s foot size.

    No mics and no muffling systems. I do wear an earplug in my right ear since the ride cymbal “ping” can cause me some problems in that ear. Nothing in the left (my monitor side.)

    Say no to plexiglass!

  6. Thankfully, I don’t have to play in a cage. You’ve got other, more serious acoustical issues if you have to put your drummer in a plexiglass room all by himself.
    My main kit at home is an expanded set of Roland V-Customs and I have to ask what’s so bad about them? When played right and configured correctly, they sound fabulous. The dynamic range is there and everything. The “Rosewood” kit selection sounds marvelous when configured with the small theater setting.

    My other kit is a standard early Seventies-era Ludwig three toms and a kick, plus an ancient Slingerland snare in chromed steel (love that snare). Ludwig silver dots on the toms, Remo Emperor batters on the snare and kick. ProMark 747 and 707 sticks, both nylon-tipped.

    At church I play a plain vanilla set of Pearl Exports. And though there’s a fairly nice DW pedal on them, I choose my 40-year-old Pearl pedal–built like a tank and made for a real man’s foot size.

    No mics and no muffling systems. I do wear an earplug in my right ear since the ride cymbal “ping” can cause me some problems in that ear. Nothing in the left (my monitor side.)

    Say no to plexiglass!

  7. Thankfully, I don’t have to play in a cage. You’ve got other, more serious acoustical issues if you have to put your drummer in a plexiglass room all by himself.
    My main kit at home is an expanded set of Roland V-Customs and I have to ask what’s so bad about them? When played right and configured correctly, they sound fabulous. The dynamic range is there and everything. The “Rosewood” kit selection sounds marvelous when configured with the small theater setting.

    My other kit is a standard early Seventies-era Ludwig three toms and a kick, plus an ancient Slingerland snare in chromed steel (love that snare). Ludwig silver dots on the toms, Remo Emperor batters on the snare and kick. ProMark 747 and 707 sticks, both nylon-tipped.

    At church I play a plain vanilla set of Pearl Exports. And though there’s a fairly nice DW pedal on them, I choose my 40-year-old Pearl pedal–built like a tank and made for a real man’s foot size.

    No mics and no muffling systems. I do wear an earplug in my right ear since the ride cymbal “ping” can cause me some problems in that ear. Nothing in the left (my monitor side.)

    Say no to plexiglass!

  8. Thankfully, I don’t have to play in a cage. You’ve got other, more serious acoustical issues if you have to put your drummer in a plexiglass room all by himself.
    My main kit at home is an expanded set of Roland V-Customs and I have to ask what’s so bad about them? When played right and configured correctly, they sound fabulous. The dynamic range is there and everything. The “Rosewood” kit selection sounds marvelous when configured with the small theater setting.

    My other kit is a standard early Seventies-era Ludwig three toms and a kick, plus an ancient Slingerland snare in chromed steel (love that snare). Ludwig silver dots on the toms, Remo Emperor batters on the snare and kick. ProMark 747 and 707 sticks, both nylon-tipped.

    At church I play a plain vanilla set of Pearl Exports. And though there’s a fairly nice DW pedal on them, I choose my 40-year-old Pearl pedal–built like a tank and made for a real man’s foot size.

    No mics and no muffling systems. I do wear an earplug in my right ear since the ride cymbal “ping” can cause me some problems in that ear. Nothing in the left (my monitor side.)

    Say no to plexiglass!

  9. So true, it’s all so true. I’m glad that you have insight beyond the apersonal sound issues aspect of the cage, it makes me feel comfortable to know that you understand…and yes, I fear the return of the dreaded electric drums.

  10. So true, it’s all so true. I’m glad that you have insight beyond the apersonal sound issues aspect of the cage, it makes me feel comfortable to know that you understand…and yes, I fear the return of the dreaded electric drums.

  11. So true, it’s all so true. I’m glad that you have insight beyond the apersonal sound issues aspect of the cage, it makes me feel comfortable to know that you understand…and yes, I fear the return of the dreaded electric drums.

  12. So true, it’s all so true. I’m glad that you have insight beyond the apersonal sound issues aspect of the cage, it makes me feel comfortable to know that you understand…and yes, I fear the return of the dreaded electric drums.

  13. By the way, I was talking to you Rich, not to the commenter above me.

  14. By the way, I was talking to you Rich, not to the commenter above me.

  15. By the way, I was talking to you Rich, not to the commenter above me.

  16. By the way, I was talking to you Rich, not to the commenter above me.

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