5 Reasons Why You Lack Good Musicians on Your Worship Team

One of the most asked questions from worship leaders is about recruiting highly talented musicians for their worship team. Over the years, I have seen some patterns arise in my own experience as well as in talking to many worship leaders. Yes, there are a lot of good musicians out there. And, I think there are some good reasons they may not be on your team.

Attracting good musicians and keeping them is a lot of work. Here are some things missing for many worship leaders

Sloppy Support: Putting a bunch of excellent players together does not automatically allow them to succeed. Music charts that are clean, rehearsals that are well-planned, and all the support of sound, staging, and lighting are needed as well. Poor administration sometimes equals poor execution. Good players want to succeed, and they will be scared off if you prove lackluster in support.

Talent Deficit: A good musician will attract good musicians. You don’t have to be the best musician, but are you credible? Have you earned the right to lead others musically? This is also true if you put an amazing player along side someone who has never even paid for one music lesson. Your ratio has to be such that you do not have a deficit of talent that drags down quality. Otherwise, you will lose the talent you have.

Unhealthy Relationships:  Are you willing to redeploy people who don’t make the grade? Are you willing to spend time encouraging the people on your team? If you have healthy relationships this includes being able to remove people on your team that might be in the way of your ministry goals. It also will be important in showing appreciation to those that volunteer.

Rockstar Status: If you are a rockstar, forget about attracting real servants on your team. Ultimately, you cannot use a position to lead no matter who you are. Even employers who view their staff as below them eventually lose their best people. Money is not as motivating as following a leader who is a servant. How do you serve your worship team?

Unclear Purpose: Very talented musicians are like those God specifically gifts with lot of money. They feel obligated to be good stewards and invest where it will make a difference. If you cannot articulate and live out the values of what the worship team is about it makes it hard for people to invest in it with you. Why are you passionate about leading others in worship? How do you communicate that to those on your team?

I truly believe that you can have a team of very talented people. You can beg and bribe good musicians to fill a slot. However, to actually grow and keep a team staffed requires more than plugging holes. It takes heart as well as skill on the part of the worship leader. The only barrier is you. Build yourself with these things and they will come.

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

70 comments

  1. Good points Rich. Hope folks take this to heart!

  2. Agreed. This list is very helpful and intuitive. In the point about “Talent Deficient”, what do you do specifically for building up musicians who aren’t as good as you’d want them to be on your team? I understand that there are people who really aren’t good musicians, but there are also people who can be but need help. Is there a certain level you say “no” to people who aren’t talented enough to join the “team”, but you spend time with them to help them improve their gifts and abilities? Maybe even ask your other good musicians to help?

    1. Adam, I meant that if you can include people who are working on their skills, but need a critical mass or majority of better players in most cases.

      Yes, if there is a way to develop skill, great. And, including other players to help is always a good idea. However, at some point that talent has to be invested in as well. Is a person willing to pay for lessons or buy decent gear? A lot of people have “heart” but lack passion to own their craft.

      1. Ah ok. It makes sense that you indeed need the majority as better or experienced players. If it was the other way around, most likely a “train wreck” would ensue, haha. Plus the less experienced players NEED the more so they can learn from example.I like how you say “better players” too instead of specifically a certain level, because every context has musicians who aren’t as good as other contexts. Like (generally) how “mega-church” communities have more talent than smaller church communities. Either way, the better lead the less experienced.
        Definitely agree that if someone is serious about serving others with music in their church community, they need to be serious about growing their gifts, including the quality of the instrument (like anyone with a gift). If they aren’t serious, kapoot! They could do that with paid professional lessons.
        What I was wondering is if they could also equally learn from the musicians or worship leaders from their church community. The idea would be similar to how a Pastor or Elder of a local church community disciples and pours into specific people around them to teach them to be godly individuals and leaders. But in this case, the lead musicians would disciple specific musicians around them to help them become great Godly musicians.
        Do you think this idea is realistic?

        Adam
        Sent from Mobile

        1. Realistic? Not only is it real-world, it is also necessary. Fundamentally, we all need training, so mentorship is important. I’m writing right now an ebook and in it is a chapter on developing a “farm system” to do exactly what you are saying.

  3. Agreed. This list is very helpful and intuitive. In the point about “Talent Deficient”, what do you do specifically for building up musicians who aren’t as good as you’d want them to be on your team? I understand that there are people who really aren’t good musicians, but there are also people who can be but need help. Is there a certain level you say “no” to people who aren’t talented enough to join the “team”, but you spend time with them to help them improve their gifts and abilities? Maybe even ask your other good musicians to help?

    1. Adam, I meant that if you can include people who are working on their skills, but need a critical mass or majority of better players in most cases.
      Yes, if there is a way to develop skill, great. And, including other players to help is always a good idea. However, at some point that talent has to be invested in as well. Is a person willing to pay for lessons or buy decent gear? A lot of people have “heart” but lack passion to own their craft.

      1. Ah ok. It makes sense that you indeed need the majority as better or experienced players. If it was the other way around, most likely a “train wreck” would ensue, haha. Plus the less experienced players NEED the more so they can learn from example.I like how you say “better players” too instead of specifically a certain level, because every context has musicians who aren’t as good as other contexts. Like (generally) how “mega-church” communities have more talent than smaller church communities. Either way, the better lead the less experienced.
        Definitely agree that if someone is serious about serving others with music in their church community, they need to be serious about growing their gifts, including the quality of the instrument (like anyone with a gift). If they aren’t serious, kapoot! They could do that with paid professional lessons.
        What I was wondering is if they could also equally learn from the musicians or worship leaders from their church community. The idea would be similar to how a Pastor or Elder of a local church community disciples and pours into specific people around them to teach them to be godly individuals and leaders. But in this case, the lead musicians would disciple specific musicians around them to help them become great Godly musicians.
        Do you think this idea is realistic?
        Adam
        Sent from Mobile

        1. Realistic? Not only is it real-world, it is also necessary. Fundamentally, we all need training, so mentorship is important. I’m writing right now an ebook and in it is a chapter on developing a “farm system” to do exactly what you are saying.

          1. Looking forward to reading the book.

  4. Agreed. This list is very helpful and intuitive. In the point about “Talent Deficient”, what do you do specifically for building up musicians who aren’t as good as you’d want them to be on your team? I understand that there are people who really aren’t good musicians, but there are also people who can be but need help. Is there a certain level you say “no” to people who aren’t talented enough to join the “team”, but you spend time with them to help them improve their gifts and abilities? Maybe even ask your other good musicians to help?

    1. Adam, I meant that if you can include people who are working on their skills, but need a critical mass or majority of better players in most cases.

      Yes, if there is a way to develop skill, great. And, including other players to help is always a good idea. However, at some point that talent has to be invested in as well. Is a person willing to pay for lessons or buy decent gear? A lot of people have “heart” but lack passion to own their craft.

      1. Ah ok. It makes sense that you indeed need the majority as better or experienced players. If it was the other way around, most likely a “train wreck” would ensue, haha. Plus the less experienced players NEED the more so they can learn from example.I like how you say “better players” too instead of specifically a certain level, because every context has musicians who aren’t as good as other contexts. Like (generally) how “mega-church” communities have more talent than smaller church communities. Either way, the better lead the less experienced.
        Definitely agree that if someone is serious about serving others with music in their church community, they need to be serious about growing their gifts, including the quality of the instrument (like anyone with a gift). If they aren’t serious, kapoot! They could do that with paid professional lessons.
        What I was wondering is if they could also equally learn from the musicians or worship leaders from their church community. The idea would be similar to how a Pastor or Elder of a local church community disciples and pours into specific people around them to teach them to be godly individuals and leaders. But in this case, the lead musicians would disciple specific musicians around them to help them become great Godly musicians.
        Do you think this idea is realistic?

        Adam
        Sent from Mobile

        1. Realistic? Not only is it real-world, it is also necessary. Fundamentally, we all need training, so mentorship is important. I’m writing right now an ebook and in it is a chapter on developing a “farm system” to do exactly what you are saying.

  5. Agreed. This list is very helpful and intuitive. In the point about “Talent Deficient”, what do you do specifically for building up musicians who aren’t as good as you’d want them to be on your team? I understand that there are people who really aren’t good musicians, but there are also people who can be but need help. Is there a certain level you say “no” to people who aren’t talented enough to join the “team”, but you spend time with them to help them improve their gifts and abilities? Maybe even ask your other good musicians to help?

    1. Adam, I meant that if you can include people who are working on their skills, but need a critical mass or majority of better players in most cases.

      Yes, if there is a way to develop skill, great. And, including other players to help is always a good idea. However, at some point that talent has to be invested in as well. Is a person willing to pay for lessons or buy decent gear? A lot of people have “heart” but lack passion to own their craft.

      1. Ah ok. It makes sense that you indeed need the majority as better or experienced players. If it was the other way around, most likely a “train wreck” would ensue, haha. Plus the less experienced players NEED the more so they can learn from example.I like how you say “better players” too instead of specifically a certain level, because every context has musicians who aren’t as good as other contexts. Like (generally) how “mega-church” communities have more talent than smaller church communities. Either way, the better lead the less experienced.
        Definitely agree that if someone is serious about serving others with music in their church community, they need to be serious about growing their gifts, including the quality of the instrument (like anyone with a gift). If they aren’t serious, kapoot! They could do that with paid professional lessons.
        What I was wondering is if they could also equally learn from the musicians or worship leaders from their church community. The idea would be similar to how a Pastor or Elder of a local church community disciples and pours into specific people around them to teach them to be godly individuals and leaders. But in this case, the lead musicians would disciple specific musicians around them to help them become great Godly musicians.
        Do you think this idea is realistic?

        Adam
        Sent from Mobile

        1. Realistic? Not only is it real-world, it is also necessary. Fundamentally, we all need training, so mentorship is important. I’m writing right now an ebook and in it is a chapter on developing a “farm system” to do exactly what you are saying.

  6. Agreed. This list is very helpful and intuitive. In the point about “Talent Deficient”, what do you do specifically for building up musicians who aren’t as good as you’d want them to be on your team? I understand that there are people who really aren’t good musicians, but there are also people who can be but need help. Is there a certain level you say “no” to people who aren’t talented enough to join the “team”, but you spend time with them to help them improve their gifts and abilities? Maybe even ask your other good musicians to help?

    1. Adam, I meant that if you can include people who are working on their skills, but need a critical mass or majority of better players in most cases.

      Yes, if there is a way to develop skill, great. And, including other players to help is always a good idea. However, at some point that talent has to be invested in as well. Is a person willing to pay for lessons or buy decent gear? A lot of people have “heart” but lack passion to own their craft.

      1. Ah ok. It makes sense that you indeed need the majority as better or experienced players. If it was the other way around, most likely a “train wreck” would ensue, haha. Plus the less experienced players NEED the more so they can learn from example.I like how you say “better players” too instead of specifically a certain level, because every context has musicians who aren’t as good as other contexts. Like (generally) how “mega-church” communities have more talent than smaller church communities. Either way, the better lead the less experienced.
        Definitely agree that if someone is serious about serving others with music in their church community, they need to be serious about growing their gifts, including the quality of the instrument (like anyone with a gift). If they aren’t serious, kapoot! They could do that with paid professional lessons.
        What I was wondering is if they could also equally learn from the musicians or worship leaders from their church community. The idea would be similar to how a Pastor or Elder of a local church community disciples and pours into specific people around them to teach them to be godly individuals and leaders. But in this case, the lead musicians would disciple specific musicians around them to help them become great Godly musicians.
        Do you think this idea is realistic?

        Adam
        Sent from Mobile

        1. Realistic? Not only is it real-world, it is also necessary. Fundamentally, we all need training, so mentorship is important. I’m writing right now an ebook and in it is a chapter on developing a “farm system” to do exactly what you are saying.

  7. This is excellent, Rich. Well said.

  8. This is excellent, Rich. Well said.

  9. This is excellent, Rich. Well said.

  10. This is excellent, Rich. Well said.

  11. This is excellent, Rich. Well said.

  12. Articulate and wise, Rich. At the risk of seeming to ruin your “perfect” 5, I wonder if an additional point might be not challenging them to be leaders themselves… In other words, I’ve found that great players are often under-challenged if they’re reached a certain skill level. Part of supporting them well is seeing areas where they can grow in helping mentor and train younger/less proficient players, and plugging them into those relationships.

    1. Yes, Fred. Sometimes we get too comfortable with a good player being in a “slot” that we do not push their boundaries to allow them to become leaders. The more leaders we have, the more teams, etc.

    2. Yes I agree…but my problem is not being “under challenged” it is being under appreciated. I create all the charts for our worship team. I write them as to give cues to the other (less experienced) musicians as to when they should play and whether it should be lightly, hitting just the down beat, sustained chords, when the drums come in, etc. And our Worship Leader said that she doesn’t want to “over think” it. I think we need a structure. And we can deviate from it, but the musicians we have need on-chart guidance. So I haven’t stopped putting in the cues. And generally she uses them, but if we happen to use an old chart, then there’s no guidance and we have to think back to how we did it last time. I ascribe to the “Tom Clancy” theory — “if you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen” (from his Executive Orders book). Our WL doesn’t think critically about dynamics. She doesn’t even read music or know anything about keys, tempo, time signature, etc. It makes it difficult when she picks three disparate songs without a thought to flow! I’ve been trying to educate her, showing her how moving to higher modulations and having the point you want emphasized in the song by the music (ie, higher pitch range for the chorus to differentiate it from the verses, doing the bridge at full band, or with only light accompaniment, etc). She is gradually getting it. But I feel ready for leading worship — and she’s picked a 18 yr old, who has little range and experience, to lead (as one of three rotating leaders, including her). Yes he has a heart, but the skill and voice is lacking. I am the oldest member of the team, she is 40, I’m in my 50s and our other leader is 29. Then the rest of the musicians are teens. She tends to favor the younger ones. Ageism?

      1. Favoring the young is our call, right? Do we want a church that our kids can give to our grandkids or one that we are comfortable with that disappears? Faith is meant to be passed on to the next group, not held on by us who are older. This is painful, but the daughter-in-law eventually gets to cook the turkey at Thanksgiving even if she doesn’t do it the same way.

        Thanks for chiming in here.

        RK

        1. What about a bit of respect for the work I put in? And the talent I have put hours and hours in — to develop what God gifted me with. I bite my tongue and give her the respect she’s due as leader, but it should be a two – way street. The relationship has been getting better and I believe it is because I have been praying and seeking God about this matter, rather than revisiting (in my mind) the disrespect that is shown me from time to time. A bit of respect could be shown by even asking my contribution to help with selection of songs, even if I’m not called to lead as a vocal/instrumentalist. I do believe our worship experience would be better were there a bit more communication between the worship leader(s) selecting the songs and the pastor to create cohesive worship experience. God didn’t say we should not plan, and take matters into account, in fact, he says the exact opposite (Luke 14:28).

  13. Articulate and wise, Rich. At the risk of seeming to ruin your “perfect” 5, I wonder if an additional point might be not challenging them to be leaders themselves… In other words, I’ve found that great players are often under-challenged if they’re reached a certain skill level. Part of supporting them well is seeing areas where they can grow in helping mentor and train younger/less proficient players, and plugging them into those relationships.

    1. Yes, Fred. Sometimes we get too comfortable with a good player being in a “slot” that we do not push their boundaries to allow them to become leaders. The more leaders we have, the more teams, etc.

    2. Yes I agree…but my problem is not being “under challenged” it is being under appreciated. I create all the charts for our worship team. I write them as to give cues to the other (less experienced) musicians as to when they should play and whether it should be lightly, hitting just the down beat, sustained chords, when the drums come in, etc. And our Worship Leader said that she doesn’t want to “over think” it. I think we need a structure. And we can deviate from it, but the musicians we have need on-chart guidance. So I haven’t stopped putting in the cues. And generally she uses them, but if we happen to use an old chart, then there’s no guidance and we have to think back to how we did it last time. I ascribe to the “Tom Clancy” theory — “if you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen” (from his Executive Orders book). Our WL doesn’t think critically about dynamics. She doesn’t even read music or know anything about keys, tempo, time signature, etc. It makes it difficult when she picks three disparate songs without a thought to flow! I’ve been trying to educate her, showing her how moving to higher modulations and having the point you want emphasized in the song by the music (ie, higher pitch range for the chorus to differentiate it from the verses, doing the bridge at full band, or with only light accompaniment, etc). She is gradually getting it. But I feel ready for leading worship — and she’s picked a 18 yr old, who has little range and experience, to lead (as one of three rotating leaders, including her). Yes he has a heart, but the skill and voice is lacking. I am the oldest member of the team, she is 40, I’m in my 50s and our other leader is 29. Then the rest of the musicians are teens. She tends to favor the younger ones. Ageism?

      1. Favoring the young is our call, right? Do we want a church that our kids can give to our grandkids or one that we are comfortable with that disappears? Faith is meant to be passed on to the next group, not held on by us who are older. This is painful, but the daughter-in-law eventually gets to cook the turkey at Thanksgiving even if she doesn’t do it the same way.
        Thanks for chiming in here.
        RK

        1. What about a bit of respect for the work I put in? And the talent I have put hours and hours in — to develop what God gifted me with. I bite my tongue and give her the respect she’s due as leader, but it should be a two – way street. The relationship has been getting better and I believe it is because I have been praying and seeking God about this matter, rather than revisiting (in my mind) the disrespect that is shown me from time to time. A bit of respect could be shown by even asking my contribution to help with selection of songs, even if I’m not called to lead as a vocal/instrumentalist. I do believe our worship experience would be better were there a bit more communication between the worship leader(s) selecting the songs and the pastor to create cohesive worship experience. God didn’t say we should not plan, and take matters into account, in fact, he says the exact opposite (Luke 14:28).

  14. Articulate and wise, Rich. At the risk of seeming to ruin your “perfect” 5, I wonder if an additional point might be not challenging them to be leaders themselves… In other words, I’ve found that great players are often under-challenged if they’re reached a certain skill level. Part of supporting them well is seeing areas where they can grow in helping mentor and train younger/less proficient players, and plugging them into those relationships.

    1. Yes, Fred. Sometimes we get too comfortable with a good player being in a “slot” that we do not push their boundaries to allow them to become leaders. The more leaders we have, the more teams, etc.

    2. Yes I agree…but my problem is not being “under challenged” it is being under appreciated. I create all the charts for our worship team. I write them as to give cues to the other (less experienced) musicians as to when they should play and whether it should be lightly, hitting just the down beat, sustained chords, when the drums come in, etc. And our Worship Leader said that she doesn’t want to “over think” it. I think we need a structure. And we can deviate from it, but the musicians we have need on-chart guidance. So I haven’t stopped putting in the cues. And generally she uses them, but if we happen to use an old chart, then there’s no guidance and we have to think back to how we did it last time. I ascribe to the “Tom Clancy” theory — “if you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen” (from his Executive Orders book). Our WL doesn’t think critically about dynamics. She doesn’t even read music or know anything about keys, tempo, time signature, etc. It makes it difficult when she picks three disparate songs without a thought to flow! I’ve been trying to educate her, showing her how moving to higher modulations and having the point you want emphasized in the song by the music (ie, higher pitch range for the chorus to differentiate it from the verses, doing the bridge at full band, or with only light accompaniment, etc). She is gradually getting it. But I feel ready for leading worship — and she’s picked a 18 yr old, who has little range and experience, to lead (as one of three rotating leaders, including her). Yes he has a heart, but the skill and voice is lacking. I am the oldest member of the team, she is 40, I’m in my 50s and our other leader is 29. Then the rest of the musicians are teens. She tends to favor the younger ones. Ageism?

      1. Favoring the young is our call, right? Do we want a church that our kids can give to our grandkids or one that we are comfortable with that disappears? Faith is meant to be passed on to the next group, not held on by us who are older. This is painful, but the daughter-in-law eventually gets to cook the turkey at Thanksgiving even if she doesn’t do it the same way.

        Thanks for chiming in here.

        RK

        1. What about a bit of respect for the work I put in? And the talent I have put hours and hours in — to develop what God gifted me with. I bite my tongue and give her the respect she’s due as leader, but it should be a two – way street. The relationship has been getting better and I believe it is because I have been praying and seeking God about this matter, rather than revisiting (in my mind) the disrespect that is shown me from time to time. A bit of respect could be shown by even asking my contribution to help with selection of songs, even if I’m not called to lead as a vocal/instrumentalist. I do believe our worship experience would be better were there a bit more communication between the worship leader(s) selecting the songs and the pastor to create cohesive worship experience. God didn’t say we should not plan, and take matters into account, in fact, he says the exact opposite (Luke 14:28).

  15. Articulate and wise, Rich. At the risk of seeming to ruin your “perfect” 5, I wonder if an additional point might be not challenging them to be leaders themselves… In other words, I’ve found that great players are often under-challenged if they’re reached a certain skill level. Part of supporting them well is seeing areas where they can grow in helping mentor and train younger/less proficient players, and plugging them into those relationships.

    1. Yes, Fred. Sometimes we get too comfortable with a good player being in a “slot” that we do not push their boundaries to allow them to become leaders. The more leaders we have, the more teams, etc.

    2. Yes I agree…but my problem is not being “under challenged” it is being under appreciated. I create all the charts for our worship team. I write them as to give cues to the other (less experienced) musicians as to when they should play and whether it should be lightly, hitting just the down beat, sustained chords, when the drums come in, etc. And our Worship Leader said that she doesn’t want to “over think” it. I think we need a structure. And we can deviate from it, but the musicians we have need on-chart guidance. So I haven’t stopped putting in the cues. And generally she uses them, but if we happen to use an old chart, then there’s no guidance and we have to think back to how we did it last time. I ascribe to the “Tom Clancy” theory — “if you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen” (from his Executive Orders book). Our WL doesn’t think critically about dynamics. She doesn’t even read music or know anything about keys, tempo, time signature, etc. It makes it difficult when she picks three disparate songs without a thought to flow! I’ve been trying to educate her, showing her how moving to higher modulations and having the point you want emphasized in the song by the music (ie, higher pitch range for the chorus to differentiate it from the verses, doing the bridge at full band, or with only light accompaniment, etc). She is gradually getting it. But I feel ready for leading worship — and she’s picked a 18 yr old, who has little range and experience, to lead (as one of three rotating leaders, including her). Yes he has a heart, but the skill and voice is lacking. I am the oldest member of the team, she is 40, I’m in my 50s and our other leader is 29. Then the rest of the musicians are teens. She tends to favor the younger ones. Ageism?

      1. Favoring the young is our call, right? Do we want a church that our kids can give to our grandkids or one that we are comfortable with that disappears? Faith is meant to be passed on to the next group, not held on by us who are older. This is painful, but the daughter-in-law eventually gets to cook the turkey at Thanksgiving even if she doesn’t do it the same way.

        Thanks for chiming in here.

        RK

        1. What about a bit of respect for the work I put in? And the talent I have put hours and hours in — to develop what God gifted me with. I bite my tongue and give her the respect she’s due as leader, but it should be a two – way street. The relationship has been getting better and I believe it is because I have been praying and seeking God about this matter, rather than revisiting (in my mind) the disrespect that is shown me from time to time. A bit of respect could be shown by even asking my contribution to help with selection of songs, even if I’m not called to lead as a vocal/instrumentalist. I do believe our worship experience would be better were there a bit more communication between the worship leader(s) selecting the songs and the pastor to create cohesive worship experience. God didn’t say we should not plan, and take matters into account, in fact, he says the exact opposite (Luke 14:28).

  16. Articulate and wise, Rich. At the risk of seeming to ruin your “perfect” 5, I wonder if an additional point might be not challenging them to be leaders themselves… In other words, I’ve found that great players are often under-challenged if they’re reached a certain skill level. Part of supporting them well is seeing areas where they can grow in helping mentor and train younger/less proficient players, and plugging them into those relationships.

    1. Yes, Fred. Sometimes we get too comfortable with a good player being in a “slot” that we do not push their boundaries to allow them to become leaders. The more leaders we have, the more teams, etc.

    2. Yes I agree…but my problem is not being “under challenged” it is being under appreciated. I create all the charts for our worship team. I write them as to give cues to the other (less experienced) musicians as to when they should play and whether it should be lightly, hitting just the down beat, sustained chords, when the drums come in, etc. And our Worship Leader said that she doesn’t want to “over think” it. I think we need a structure. And we can deviate from it, but the musicians we have need on-chart guidance. So I haven’t stopped putting in the cues. And generally she uses them, but if we happen to use an old chart, then there’s no guidance and we have to think back to how we did it last time. I ascribe to the “Tom Clancy” theory — “if you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen” (from his Executive Orders book). Our WL doesn’t think critically about dynamics. She doesn’t even read music or know anything about keys, tempo, time signature, etc. It makes it difficult when she picks three disparate songs without a thought to flow! I’ve been trying to educate her, showing her how moving to higher modulations and having the point you want emphasized in the song by the music (ie, higher pitch range for the chorus to differentiate it from the verses, doing the bridge at full band, or with only light accompaniment, etc). She is gradually getting it. But I feel ready for leading worship — and she’s picked a 18 yr old, who has little range and experience, to lead (as one of three rotating leaders, including her). Yes he has a heart, but the skill and voice is lacking. I am the oldest member of the team, she is 40, I’m in my 50s and our other leader is 29. Then the rest of the musicians are teens. She tends to favor the younger ones. Ageism?

      1. Favoring the young is our call, right? Do we want a church that our kids can give to our grandkids or one that we are comfortable with that disappears? Faith is meant to be passed on to the next group, not held on by us who are older. This is painful, but the daughter-in-law eventually gets to cook the turkey at Thanksgiving even if she doesn’t do it the same way.

        Thanks for chiming in here.

        RK

        1. What about a bit of respect for the work I put in? And the talent I have put hours and hours in — to develop what God gifted me with. I bite my tongue and give her the respect she’s due as leader, but it should be a two – way street. The relationship has been getting better and I believe it is because I have been praying and seeking God about this matter, rather than revisiting (in my mind) the disrespect that is shown me from time to time. A bit of respect could be shown by even asking my contribution to help with selection of songs, even if I’m not called to lead as a vocal/instrumentalist. I do believe our worship experience would be better were there a bit more communication between the worship leader(s) selecting the songs and the pastor to create cohesive worship experience. God didn’t say we should not plan, and take matters into account, in fact, he says the exact opposite (Luke 14:28).

  17. We need churches that are willing to train musicians to be excellent. Play skillfully unto the Lord. People that are willing to raise each other up and teach. Quality and skill need to be valued in churches, we need to strive to give the best to glorify God. Good conversation.

  18. We need churches that are willing to train musicians to be excellent. Play skillfully unto the Lord. People that are willing to raise each other up and teach. Quality and skill need to be valued in churches, we need to strive to give the best to glorify God. Good conversation.

  19. We need churches that are willing to train musicians to be excellent. Play skillfully unto the Lord. People that are willing to raise each other up and teach. Quality and skill need to be valued in churches, we need to strive to give the best to glorify God. Good conversation.

  20. We need churches that are willing to train musicians to be excellent. Play skillfully unto the Lord. People that are willing to raise each other up and teach. Quality and skill need to be valued in churches, we need to strive to give the best to glorify God. Good conversation.

  21. We need churches that are willing to train musicians to be excellent. Play skillfully unto the Lord. People that are willing to raise each other up and teach. Quality and skill need to be valued in churches, we need to strive to give the best to glorify God. Good conversation.

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