To Pay or Not to Pay: 5 GOOD reasons you should pay your church musicians!

I believe volunteerism is the backbone of any thriving local church. And, I do not think a church that decides to never pay anyone a salary or stipend can be justifiable. There is freedom in how we operate many things in the local church. With that being said, sometimes you need a tool or specialty that if done with a volunteer might inhibit the whole of your work. This missing piece, such as leadership and organization, might slow the movement of many. A teacher tied to working two jobs may work out perfectly, but will he or she have time to develop other teachers?

There are a few reasons that make sense when it comes to paying musicians. You can feel free to substitute the word “musician” with other creative professionals such as “audio techs” or “photographers” and so forth.  

Here are five of the best ones I have experienced:

When there is a hole. I have a Christmas show and the drummer and principle violinist both cancelled. No volunteer could learn the music on such a short notice. All that is invested makes it practical to fill with a professional. A Sunday service of volunteer teams may be thin when a couple in your team have babies, or get a new job.

When you need leadership. It is one thing to have a team of volunteers deployed, but they might need help in learning musicianship. Directing a rehearsal impacts the execution of the entire group. A professional could bring an efficiency to make room for even more volunteers by preparing musical charts.

When you choose community. Strategically choosing to pay the best musicians in your community to participate in some way allows you a neutral playing field to make relationships. These relationships turn into real friendships, beyond professional. They allow you to send to the message to your community that you value the creative people in your town.

When you want excellence. The bigger your church, the less the “empathy factor” actually works for you. People do not personally know who is on stage, so they will notice their skill or lack of skill. That can be an asset if they are very good or hurt you if they are not. So, paying to have a skilled group can allow you to connect to a large crowd better if that is what your situation is.

When you desire to invest. Sometimes, paying your musicians can be an investment if they are actually professionals. A guitarist or drummer or keyboard player might spend thousands on the gear needed to do their thing. A vocalist, if professional, has spent more than that on lessons and practice. To be a patron means you allow these creative to create more in their community. Even a stipend for guitar strings can mean a lot. Drum sticks are not cheap, either! Showing appreciation is never a bad decision.

Ultimately, it is a choice. There are equally bad reasons to pay. For instance, pride is the worst. To simply want “the best band” or to foster entitlement will hurt your ministry. But, done in the right way, paying your musicians can bring rewards.

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

55 comments

  1. Great post Rich. I think you’re spot on. There is always a need to understand the vision and culture of leadership for each specific church when weighing these options. I like to say ‘we resource what we value’…and your insight here helps shed some light on reasons we might choose to honor and resource some of our most valuable creative assets.

  2. Great post Rich. I think you’re spot on. There is always a need to understand the vision and culture of leadership for each specific church when weighing these options. I like to say ‘we resource what we value’…and your insight here helps shed some light on reasons we might choose to honor and resource some of our most valuable creative assets.

  3. Great post Rich. I think you’re spot on. There is always a need to understand the vision and culture of leadership for each specific church when weighing these options. I like to say ‘we resource what we value’…and your insight here helps shed some light on reasons we might choose to honor and resource some of our most valuable creative assets.

  4. Great post Rich. I think you’re spot on. There is always a need to understand the vision and culture of leadership for each specific church when weighing these options. I like to say ‘we resource what we value’…and your insight here helps shed some light on reasons we might choose to honor and resource some of our most valuable creative assets.

  5. Great post Rich. I think you’re spot on. There is always a need to understand the vision and culture of leadership for each specific church when weighing these options. I like to say ‘we resource what we value’…and your insight here helps shed some light on reasons we might choose to honor and resource some of our most valuable creative assets.

  6. Hi Rich,You don’t mention whether the person being paid should be a Christian or not. I would hope that everyone who serves on a church team is a believer and has similar values, whether it is decided they should be reimbursed or not.
    Cheers,

    1. Bren, it is quite possible to hire a structural engineer to work on building a place of worship that will shape the communication of your theology. Likewise, there may be some situations where you may hire a professional to play music, design a graphic, or create something under your direction. Obviously, leadership should not be the place for an unbeliever or even a new believer. But, if a church is feeding the poor and a community member outside the faith wanted to serve, should we forbid their presence and participation?

      Following Jesus, or being a disciple, is a process. So, it is accurate in some cases to allow someone who is in that process to participate at some level. We have set up a model that defines Christians by their facility with creed rather than their movement to follow Jesus in action. Belonging may come before believing. This does not mean neglecting to say to an unbeliever what your moral standards are or what believing is. In fact, the professional relationship encourages reaching a person seeking to connect through participation.

      I believe there are differing convictions on this, but my opinion is that there can be a place where this works. In fact, it may be that the only ones you pay are your unbelieving musicians. But, to be strategic there has to be an openness to all involved that the desire is that the musician would become a follower of Jesus.

      1. Hi Rich,Thanks for your detailed reply. I can’t disagree with your view to pay engineers, or what I would consider ‘behind the scenes’ employees. We are “in the world, not of the world” and should make every effort to interact with the community with a view of showing them Jesus.
        However, where I would draw the line, is up front ministries. Whether music or any other position that is on the platform during a service, I believe these people need to be held to a higher standard.
        We may disagree and I’m sure we’re both fine with that.

      2. I appreciate your post immensely. King David had thousands of musicians whose only job was 24 hour praise to God. The church should, if possible, support those professionals who wish to give their all in ministry.

        I would like to echo what Bren said, and add that unity of spirit is more important than unity of tempo or harmonic. Without vision the people parish, and if the musicians on the worship team are without a common vision they will inevitably tear the church in two directions.

        I think following Christ is a journey, but it’s a journey with an defined beginning. No matter how much they are searching for truth, if they have not called upon the name of Jesus to be saved, they are lost. They are in darkness.

        “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”

        I believe serving on a worship team is tying yourself with other people. Sorry for the long rabbit trail. I can’t stand it when people argue off topic, and here I’m committing the terrible crime.

        1. Thanks for sharing! Here is a question: is it unequally yoked if in the majority? I am not sure we can apply it in the negative the same way. And, Jesus said many call him by name but are not followers. So, not sure we should ban a person who is not fully there yet. In fact, even the OT temple had a gentile court. Where is our gentile court?

          1. Wow! A quick reply! What an honor! Thank you! I’ll take the two question marks in your post as permission for further response.

            I think the difference is in the old testament, the Gentiles weren’t called to join up. They wanted the separation. We’re called to beg and plead with people to come to God.
            I think that if 90% of the people are playing music to glorify God, and lead people in worship to God, and 10% of the people are playing music just for kicks and/or a paycheck it sends mixed messages to the people in the seats.

            Is church a place that tricks people into coming with great music and two months later goes, “Psych! We were actually here to save your soul!” Or is it a place where believers assemble to be equipped to take the gospel out into the streets?

            Honestly I don’t think a church building is the best place to witness to people. I think churches get caught up in attracting people and drop the ball on discipleship. People should get saved at work or in people’s homes and then go to church to get built up to spread the kingdom further.

          2. I think in the OT all people were called to worship God. And, the Church is the Church, whether in a building or not. The point is a “both and” here–the church service is designed to send out people as we equip believers, but in 1 Corinthians 14 we clearly see Paul teaching about how to treat unbelievers in our midst. The point is this: we all have convictions. This is not a theological debate. I am just trying to allow you to affirm the veracity of others who have a different conviction than you do. There really is not clear blanket answer for all time in all places on this issue, right?RK

          3. Hey Rich, thanks for your reply. You’re right, the Bible doesn’t have a specific answer to this question. We can certainly argue about verses that pertain to our interactions with unbelievers, but there’s no exact command. Honestly, I think a lot of my conviction comes from past teams where the team was always being pulled apart by worshippers and non-worshippers. It was definitely a music team, but beyond that it was anybody’s guess. Thanks for the chat! Your posts are always so inspiring and informative.

  7. Hi Rich,You don’t mention whether the person being paid should be a Christian or not. I would hope that everyone who serves on a church team is a believer and has similar values, whether it is decided they should be reimbursed or not.
    Cheers,

    1. Bren, it is quite possible to hire a structural engineer to work on building a place of worship that will shape the communication of your theology. Likewise, there may be some situations where you may hire a professional to play music, design a graphic, or create something under your direction. Obviously, leadership should not be the place for an unbeliever or even a new believer. But, if a church is feeding the poor and a community member outside the faith wanted to serve, should we forbid their presence and participation?
      Following Jesus, or being a disciple, is a process. So, it is accurate in some cases to allow someone who is in that process to participate at some level. We have set up a model that defines Christians by their facility with creed rather than their movement to follow Jesus in action. Belonging may come before believing. This does not mean neglecting to say to an unbeliever what your moral standards are or what believing is. In fact, the professional relationship encourages reaching a person seeking to connect through participation.
      I believe there are differing convictions on this, but my opinion is that there can be a place where this works. In fact, it may be that the only ones you pay are your unbelieving musicians. But, to be strategic there has to be an openness to all involved that the desire is that the musician would become a follower of Jesus.

      1. Hi Rich,Thanks for your detailed reply. I can’t disagree with your view to pay engineers, or what I would consider ‘behind the scenes’ employees. We are “in the world, not of the world” and should make every effort to interact with the community with a view of showing them Jesus.
        However, where I would draw the line, is up front ministries. Whether music or any other position that is on the platform during a service, I believe these people need to be held to a higher standard.
        We may disagree and I’m sure we’re both fine with that.

      2. I appreciate your post immensely. King David had thousands of musicians whose only job was 24 hour praise to God. The church should, if possible, support those professionals who wish to give their all in ministry.
        I would like to echo what Bren said, and add that unity of spirit is more important than unity of tempo or harmonic. Without vision the people parish, and if the musicians on the worship team are without a common vision they will inevitably tear the church in two directions.
        I think following Christ is a journey, but it’s a journey with an defined beginning. No matter how much they are searching for truth, if they have not called upon the name of Jesus to be saved, they are lost. They are in darkness.
        “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”
        I believe serving on a worship team is tying yourself with other people. Sorry for the long rabbit trail. I can’t stand it when people argue off topic, and here I’m committing the terrible crime.

        1. Thanks for sharing! Here is a question: is it unequally yoked if in the majority? I am not sure we can apply it in the negative the same way. And, Jesus said many call him by name but are not followers. So, not sure we should ban a person who is not fully there yet. In fact, even the OT temple had a gentile court. Where is our gentile court?

          1. Wow! A quick reply! What an honor! Thank you! I’ll take the two question marks in your post as permission for further response.
            I think the difference is in the old testament, the Gentiles weren’t called to join up. They wanted the separation. We’re called to beg and plead with people to come to God.
            I think that if 90% of the people are playing music to glorify God, and lead people in worship to God, and 10% of the people are playing music just for kicks and/or a paycheck it sends mixed messages to the people in the seats.
            Is church a place that tricks people into coming with great music and two months later goes, “Psych! We were actually here to save your soul!” Or is it a place where believers assemble to be equipped to take the gospel out into the streets?
            Honestly I don’t think a church building is the best place to witness to people. I think churches get caught up in attracting people and drop the ball on discipleship. People should get saved at work or in people’s homes and then go to church to get built up to spread the kingdom further.

          2. I think in the OT all people were called to worship God. And, the Church is the Church, whether in a building or not. The point is a “both and” here–the church service is designed to send out people as we equip believers, but in 1 Corinthians 14 we clearly see Paul teaching about how to treat unbelievers in our midst. The point is this: we all have convictions. This is not a theological debate. I am just trying to allow you to affirm the veracity of others who have a different conviction than you do. There really is not clear blanket answer for all time in all places on this issue, right?RK

          3. Hey Rich, thanks for your reply. You’re right, the Bible doesn’t have a specific answer to this question. We can certainly argue about verses that pertain to our interactions with unbelievers, but there’s no exact command. Honestly, I think a lot of my conviction comes from past teams where the team was always being pulled apart by worshippers and non-worshippers. It was definitely a music team, but beyond that it was anybody’s guess. Thanks for the chat! Your posts are always so inspiring and informative.

  8. Hi Rich,You don’t mention whether the person being paid should be a Christian or not. I would hope that everyone who serves on a church team is a believer and has similar values, whether it is decided they should be reimbursed or not.
    Cheers,

    1. Bren, it is quite possible to hire a structural engineer to work on building a place of worship that will shape the communication of your theology. Likewise, there may be some situations where you may hire a professional to play music, design a graphic, or create something under your direction. Obviously, leadership should not be the place for an unbeliever or even a new believer. But, if a church is feeding the poor and a community member outside the faith wanted to serve, should we forbid their presence and participation?

      Following Jesus, or being a disciple, is a process. So, it is accurate in some cases to allow someone who is in that process to participate at some level. We have set up a model that defines Christians by their facility with creed rather than their movement to follow Jesus in action. Belonging may come before believing. This does not mean neglecting to say to an unbeliever what your moral standards are or what believing is. In fact, the professional relationship encourages reaching a person seeking to connect through participation.

      I believe there are differing convictions on this, but my opinion is that there can be a place where this works. In fact, it may be that the only ones you pay are your unbelieving musicians. But, to be strategic there has to be an openness to all involved that the desire is that the musician would become a follower of Jesus.

      1. Hi Rich,Thanks for your detailed reply. I can’t disagree with your view to pay engineers, or what I would consider ‘behind the scenes’ employees. We are “in the world, not of the world” and should make every effort to interact with the community with a view of showing them Jesus.
        However, where I would draw the line, is up front ministries. Whether music or any other position that is on the platform during a service, I believe these people need to be held to a higher standard.
        We may disagree and I’m sure we’re both fine with that.

      2. I appreciate your post immensely. King David had thousands of musicians whose only job was 24 hour praise to God. The church should, if possible, support those professionals who wish to give their all in ministry.

        I would like to echo what Bren said, and add that unity of spirit is more important than unity of tempo or harmonic. Without vision the people parish, and if the musicians on the worship team are without a common vision they will inevitably tear the church in two directions.

        I think following Christ is a journey, but it’s a journey with an defined beginning. No matter how much they are searching for truth, if they have not called upon the name of Jesus to be saved, they are lost. They are in darkness.

        “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”

        I believe serving on a worship team is tying yourself with other people. Sorry for the long rabbit trail. I can’t stand it when people argue off topic, and here I’m committing the terrible crime.

        1. Thanks for sharing! Here is a question: is it unequally yoked if in the majority? I am not sure we can apply it in the negative the same way. And, Jesus said many call him by name but are not followers. So, not sure we should ban a person who is not fully there yet. In fact, even the OT temple had a gentile court. Where is our gentile court?

          1. Wow! A quick reply! What an honor! Thank you! I’ll take the two question marks in your post as permission for further response.

            I think the difference is in the old testament, the Gentiles weren’t called to join up. They wanted the separation. We’re called to beg and plead with people to come to God.
            I think that if 90% of the people are playing music to glorify God, and lead people in worship to God, and 10% of the people are playing music just for kicks and/or a paycheck it sends mixed messages to the people in the seats.

            Is church a place that tricks people into coming with great music and two months later goes, “Psych! We were actually here to save your soul!” Or is it a place where believers assemble to be equipped to take the gospel out into the streets?

            Honestly I don’t think a church building is the best place to witness to people. I think churches get caught up in attracting people and drop the ball on discipleship. People should get saved at work or in people’s homes and then go to church to get built up to spread the kingdom further.

          2. I think in the OT all people were called to worship God. And, the Church is the Church, whether in a building or not. The point is a “both and” here–the church service is designed to send out people as we equip believers, but in 1 Corinthians 14 we clearly see Paul teaching about how to treat unbelievers in our midst. The point is this: we all have convictions. This is not a theological debate. I am just trying to allow you to affirm the veracity of others who have a different conviction than you do. There really is not clear blanket answer for all time in all places on this issue, right?RK

          3. Hey Rich, thanks for your reply. You’re right, the Bible doesn’t have a specific answer to this question. We can certainly argue about verses that pertain to our interactions with unbelievers, but there’s no exact command. Honestly, I think a lot of my conviction comes from past teams where the team was always being pulled apart by worshippers and non-worshippers. It was definitely a music team, but beyond that it was anybody’s guess. Thanks for the chat! Your posts are always so inspiring and informative.

  9. Hi Rich,You don’t mention whether the person being paid should be a Christian or not. I would hope that everyone who serves on a church team is a believer and has similar values, whether it is decided they should be reimbursed or not.
    Cheers,

    1. Bren, it is quite possible to hire a structural engineer to work on building a place of worship that will shape the communication of your theology. Likewise, there may be some situations where you may hire a professional to play music, design a graphic, or create something under your direction. Obviously, leadership should not be the place for an unbeliever or even a new believer. But, if a church is feeding the poor and a community member outside the faith wanted to serve, should we forbid their presence and participation?

      Following Jesus, or being a disciple, is a process. So, it is accurate in some cases to allow someone who is in that process to participate at some level. We have set up a model that defines Christians by their facility with creed rather than their movement to follow Jesus in action. Belonging may come before believing. This does not mean neglecting to say to an unbeliever what your moral standards are or what believing is. In fact, the professional relationship encourages reaching a person seeking to connect through participation.

      I believe there are differing convictions on this, but my opinion is that there can be a place where this works. In fact, it may be that the only ones you pay are your unbelieving musicians. But, to be strategic there has to be an openness to all involved that the desire is that the musician would become a follower of Jesus.

      1. Hi Rich,Thanks for your detailed reply. I can’t disagree with your view to pay engineers, or what I would consider ‘behind the scenes’ employees. We are “in the world, not of the world” and should make every effort to interact with the community with a view of showing them Jesus.
        However, where I would draw the line, is up front ministries. Whether music or any other position that is on the platform during a service, I believe these people need to be held to a higher standard.
        We may disagree and I’m sure we’re both fine with that.

      2. I appreciate your post immensely. King David had thousands of musicians whose only job was 24 hour praise to God. The church should, if possible, support those professionals who wish to give their all in ministry.

        I would like to echo what Bren said, and add that unity of spirit is more important than unity of tempo or harmonic. Without vision the people parish, and if the musicians on the worship team are without a common vision they will inevitably tear the church in two directions.

        I think following Christ is a journey, but it’s a journey with an defined beginning. No matter how much they are searching for truth, if they have not called upon the name of Jesus to be saved, they are lost. They are in darkness.

        “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”

        I believe serving on a worship team is tying yourself with other people. Sorry for the long rabbit trail. I can’t stand it when people argue off topic, and here I’m committing the terrible crime.

        1. Thanks for sharing! Here is a question: is it unequally yoked if in the majority? I am not sure we can apply it in the negative the same way. And, Jesus said many call him by name but are not followers. So, not sure we should ban a person who is not fully there yet. In fact, even the OT temple had a gentile court. Where is our gentile court?

          1. Wow! A quick reply! What an honor! Thank you! I’ll take the two question marks in your post as permission for further response.

            I think the difference is in the old testament, the Gentiles weren’t called to join up. They wanted the separation. We’re called to beg and plead with people to come to God.
            I think that if 90% of the people are playing music to glorify God, and lead people in worship to God, and 10% of the people are playing music just for kicks and/or a paycheck it sends mixed messages to the people in the seats.

            Is church a place that tricks people into coming with great music and two months later goes, “Psych! We were actually here to save your soul!” Or is it a place where believers assemble to be equipped to take the gospel out into the streets?

            Honestly I don’t think a church building is the best place to witness to people. I think churches get caught up in attracting people and drop the ball on discipleship. People should get saved at work or in people’s homes and then go to church to get built up to spread the kingdom further.

          2. I think in the OT all people were called to worship God. And, the Church is the Church, whether in a building or not. The point is a “both and” here–the church service is designed to send out people as we equip believers, but in 1 Corinthians 14 we clearly see Paul teaching about how to treat unbelievers in our midst. The point is this: we all have convictions. This is not a theological debate. I am just trying to allow you to affirm the veracity of others who have a different conviction than you do. There really is not clear blanket answer for all time in all places on this issue, right?RK

          3. Hey Rich, thanks for your reply. You’re right, the Bible doesn’t have a specific answer to this question. We can certainly argue about verses that pertain to our interactions with unbelievers, but there’s no exact command. Honestly, I think a lot of my conviction comes from past teams where the team was always being pulled apart by worshippers and non-worshippers. It was definitely a music team, but beyond that it was anybody’s guess. Thanks for the chat! Your posts are always so inspiring and informative.

  10. Hi Rich,You don’t mention whether the person being paid should be a Christian or not. I would hope that everyone who serves on a church team is a believer and has similar values, whether it is decided they should be reimbursed or not.
    Cheers,

    1. Bren, it is quite possible to hire a structural engineer to work on building a place of worship that will shape the communication of your theology. Likewise, there may be some situations where you may hire a professional to play music, design a graphic, or create something under your direction. Obviously, leadership should not be the place for an unbeliever or even a new believer. But, if a church is feeding the poor and a community member outside the faith wanted to serve, should we forbid their presence and participation?

      Following Jesus, or being a disciple, is a process. So, it is accurate in some cases to allow someone who is in that process to participate at some level. We have set up a model that defines Christians by their facility with creed rather than their movement to follow Jesus in action. Belonging may come before believing. This does not mean neglecting to say to an unbeliever what your moral standards are or what believing is. In fact, the professional relationship encourages reaching a person seeking to connect through participation.

      I believe there are differing convictions on this, but my opinion is that there can be a place where this works. In fact, it may be that the only ones you pay are your unbelieving musicians. But, to be strategic there has to be an openness to all involved that the desire is that the musician would become a follower of Jesus.

      1. Hi Rich,Thanks for your detailed reply. I can’t disagree with your view to pay engineers, or what I would consider ‘behind the scenes’ employees. We are “in the world, not of the world” and should make every effort to interact with the community with a view of showing them Jesus.
        However, where I would draw the line, is up front ministries. Whether music or any other position that is on the platform during a service, I believe these people need to be held to a higher standard.
        We may disagree and I’m sure we’re both fine with that.

      2. I appreciate your post immensely. King David had thousands of musicians whose only job was 24 hour praise to God. The church should, if possible, support those professionals who wish to give their all in ministry.

        I would like to echo what Bren said, and add that unity of spirit is more important than unity of tempo or harmonic. Without vision the people parish, and if the musicians on the worship team are without a common vision they will inevitably tear the church in two directions.

        I think following Christ is a journey, but it’s a journey with an defined beginning. No matter how much they are searching for truth, if they have not called upon the name of Jesus to be saved, they are lost. They are in darkness.

        “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”

        I believe serving on a worship team is tying yourself with other people. Sorry for the long rabbit trail. I can’t stand it when people argue off topic, and here I’m committing the terrible crime.

        1. Thanks for sharing! Here is a question: is it unequally yoked if in the majority? I am not sure we can apply it in the negative the same way. And, Jesus said many call him by name but are not followers. So, not sure we should ban a person who is not fully there yet. In fact, even the OT temple had a gentile court. Where is our gentile court?

          1. Wow! A quick reply! What an honor! Thank you! I’ll take the two question marks in your post as permission for further response.

            I think the difference is in the old testament, the Gentiles weren’t called to join up. They wanted the separation. We’re called to beg and plead with people to come to God.
            I think that if 90% of the people are playing music to glorify God, and lead people in worship to God, and 10% of the people are playing music just for kicks and/or a paycheck it sends mixed messages to the people in the seats.

            Is church a place that tricks people into coming with great music and two months later goes, “Psych! We were actually here to save your soul!” Or is it a place where believers assemble to be equipped to take the gospel out into the streets?

            Honestly I don’t think a church building is the best place to witness to people. I think churches get caught up in attracting people and drop the ball on discipleship. People should get saved at work or in people’s homes and then go to church to get built up to spread the kingdom further.

          2. I think in the OT all people were called to worship God. And, the Church is the Church, whether in a building or not. The point is a “both and” here–the church service is designed to send out people as we equip believers, but in 1 Corinthians 14 we clearly see Paul teaching about how to treat unbelievers in our midst. The point is this: we all have convictions. This is not a theological debate. I am just trying to allow you to affirm the veracity of others who have a different conviction than you do. There really is not clear blanket answer for all time in all places on this issue, right?RK

          3. Hey Rich, thanks for your reply. You’re right, the Bible doesn’t have a specific answer to this question. We can certainly argue about verses that pertain to our interactions with unbelievers, but there’s no exact command. Honestly, I think a lot of my conviction comes from past teams where the team was always being pulled apart by worshippers and non-worshippers. It was definitely a music team, but beyond that it was anybody’s guess. Thanks for the chat! Your posts are always so inspiring and informative.

  11. Well should we pay the church dancers, singers, the pastor, the sound keepers, the members, its shoulds phony..when your doing something for God I believe a seed should be given. But being a musician is not a job, you can not live off musician salary.

    1. It may surprise you that musician is a profession as is sound engineer. Some earn a humble living doing these things. So, if these are ones who feed their families by their art it is fair to at least consider paying somehow if a church can. Not all can.

  12. Well should we pay the church dancers, singers, the pastor, the sound keepers, the members, its shoulds phony..when your doing something for God I believe a seed should be given. But being a musician is not a job, you can not live off musician salary.

    1. It may surprise you that musician is a profession as is sound engineer. Some earn a humble living doing these things. So, if these are ones who feed their families by their art it is fair to at least consider paying somehow if a church can. Not all can.

  13. Well should we pay the church dancers, singers, the pastor, the sound keepers, the members, its shoulds phony..when your doing something for God I believe a seed should be given. But being a musician is not a job, you can not live off musician salary.

    1. It may surprise you that musician is a profession as is sound engineer. Some earn a humble living doing these things. So, if these are ones who feed their families by their art it is fair to at least consider paying somehow if a church can. Not all can.

  14. Well should we pay the church dancers, singers, the pastor, the sound keepers, the members, its shoulds phony..when your doing something for God I believe a seed should be given. But being a musician is not a job, you can not live off musician salary.

    1. It may surprise you that musician is a profession as is sound engineer. Some earn a humble living doing these things. So, if these are ones who feed their families by their art it is fair to at least consider paying somehow if a church can. Not all can.

  15. Well should we pay the church dancers, singers, the pastor, the sound keepers, the members, its shoulds phony..when your doing something for God I believe a seed should be given. But being a musician is not a job, you can not live off musician salary.

    1. It may surprise you that musician is a profession as is sound engineer. Some earn a humble living doing these things. So, if these are ones who feed their families by their art it is fair to at least consider paying somehow if a church can. Not all can.

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