Creatives and living with rejection: Do I have to?

Creatives are the kind of people who make the things that other people see, experience, or consume. If you are a photographer, those wedding pictures will be part of an album and seen by family members in perpetuity. The dish created for a new restaurant might make or break it for that business. A marketing campaign’s written copy could turn the corner–or not. There are no guarantees, regardless of the talent or effort, that a creative’s work will actually succeed as far as the public is concerned. Sometimes, an artist’s genius is never recognized until after his or her death.

Rejection is the expected outcome. Acceptance is the rarity a creative hopes for as a professional in his or her craft. Yes, excellent work is on the cutting room floor more that it will be in the public eye. In fact, sometimes it is an unexpected song that becomes a hit–surprise to the artist as it likely was his least favorite one. In a way, that becomes a face of rejection as well. By the time a creative presents the work, many iterations already exist in both thought and in trial. It may seem like waste, but a lot of bad songs have to be written for one great song.

To create for people is the greatest privilege. And, when you are happy with your effort and it also is appreciated as being useful a point of convergence exists. So, as a creative you know that you have to work in such a way that almost expects rejection rather than disregards it. You learn from it, but are not defined it. Keep at it long enough, you are more likely to succeed in that sweet spot where your work will earn a living, provide a service, and meet a need.

To answer the question, “YES” you have to live with rejection. So, here is the recipe: Keep creating. And, do not stop creating. Create. And, then do it some more. Then, listen to Winston Churchill speeches, and repeat “never give up…” as often as you can. That’s the secret to success in creating. Create.

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

20 comments

  1. I can really relate with this. Even knowing my creative work has good merit, others have their own opinions and perspectives, and it’s hard to take feedback that suggests what I created needs tweaking.

    But I can attest, thinking about it the way you say really does help. If I’m creating for a purpose, and know there are many ways to communicate something creatively and clearly, I really should go into it expecting different opinions and suggestions on my work. And then, I simply create again, whether from scratch or making alterations to an already creation.

    1. Very humble application to my thoughts. Thanks for sharing Adam.

  2. I can really relate with this. Even knowing my creative work has good merit, others have their own opinions and perspectives, and it’s hard to take feedback that suggests what I created needs tweaking.
    But I can attest, thinking about it the way you say really does help. If I’m creating for a purpose, and know there are many ways to communicate something creatively and clearly, I really should go into it expecting different opinions and suggestions on my work. And then, I simply create again, whether from scratch or making alterations to an already creation.

    1. Very humble application to my thoughts. Thanks for sharing Adam.

  3. I can really relate with this. Even knowing my creative work has good merit, others have their own opinions and perspectives, and it’s hard to take feedback that suggests what I created needs tweaking.

    But I can attest, thinking about it the way you say really does help. If I’m creating for a purpose, and know there are many ways to communicate something creatively and clearly, I really should go into it expecting different opinions and suggestions on my work. And then, I simply create again, whether from scratch or making alterations to an already creation.

    1. Very humble application to my thoughts. Thanks for sharing Adam.

  4. I can really relate with this. Even knowing my creative work has good merit, others have their own opinions and perspectives, and it’s hard to take feedback that suggests what I created needs tweaking.

    But I can attest, thinking about it the way you say really does help. If I’m creating for a purpose, and know there are many ways to communicate something creatively and clearly, I really should go into it expecting different opinions and suggestions on my work. And then, I simply create again, whether from scratch or making alterations to an already creation.

    1. Very humble application to my thoughts. Thanks for sharing Adam.

  5. I can really relate with this. Even knowing my creative work has good merit, others have their own opinions and perspectives, and it’s hard to take feedback that suggests what I created needs tweaking.

    But I can attest, thinking about it the way you say really does help. If I’m creating for a purpose, and know there are many ways to communicate something creatively and clearly, I really should go into it expecting different opinions and suggestions on my work. And then, I simply create again, whether from scratch or making alterations to an already creation.

    1. Very humble application to my thoughts. Thanks for sharing Adam.

  6. hey! I’m writing about all this this week! 🙂 Great minds think alike…

  7. hey! I’m writing about all this this week! 🙂 Great minds think alike…

  8. hey! I’m writing about all this this week! 🙂 Great minds think alike…

  9. hey! I’m writing about all this this week! 🙂 Great minds think alike…

  10. hey! I’m writing about all this this week! 🙂 Great minds think alike…

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