Worship Mythbusters: Reaction vs. Response 2 – questions to clarify your win in worship

This is a follow-up from this post. After teaching two workshops on Worship Mythbusters this week, I have to share some practical things in regards to the focus of leading worship for a response versus a reaction.

The question posed is this: “What three months from now or a year from now will be measurable as far as the desired response in worship?”

When I posed that to the workshop, it was at first hard for our group to clarify the wins. Too often, we worship leaders, focus on the platform moment without regard to the wake that moment in time has over the long haul. Yes, we want people to experience a closeness to God, but the mountain top is not the reality we strive to live in each day it is a point of reference for the daily norm of the valley.

So, how do we measure the lasting impact of what we do? The following questions are a start in evaluating the “response factor” for a worship service for us worship leaders.

  • What will people be humming all week long? Is that music rich enough to enrich their lives and stick with people?
  • Is the content of our lyric and attitude projected clearly biblical?
  • Are the songs meaningful or relevant to where your people are at? Do they tell their stories and express their hearts with words they can and should say?
  • What stories of life-change can be tracked back to the musical time of worship? Are people hearing from God? Are they encouraged, challenged beyond just being moved?
  • What do we expect spiritually from our congregation during the worship time?

The idea here is to continually focus not on the hairs-standing-up-on-the-neck effect but also on how people are formed to be like Jesus through our musical worship leadership. What other questions should we ask about our worship time?

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

5 comments

  1. Enjoyed meeting you this week. The “Mythbuster” discussion was great. Specific to this entry, as we discussed in the breakout, my primary metric for effectivness of a worship service is this: was God worshipped?
    I think if we can say “yes” to that, the rest is just stuff. Yes, we need to play the right chords, have a great mix, etc. But that is not the primary objective.

  2. Enjoyed meeting you this week. The “Mythbuster” discussion was great. Specific to this entry, as we discussed in the breakout, my primary metric for effectivness of a worship service is this: was God worshipped?
    I think if we can say “yes” to that, the rest is just stuff. Yes, we need to play the right chords, have a great mix, etc. But that is not the primary objective.

  3. Enjoyed meeting you this week. The “Mythbuster” discussion was great. Specific to this entry, as we discussed in the breakout, my primary metric for effectivness of a worship service is this: was God worshipped?
    I think if we can say “yes” to that, the rest is just stuff. Yes, we need to play the right chords, have a great mix, etc. But that is not the primary objective.

  4. Enjoyed meeting you this week. The “Mythbuster” discussion was great. Specific to this entry, as we discussed in the breakout, my primary metric for effectivness of a worship service is this: was God worshipped?
    I think if we can say “yes” to that, the rest is just stuff. Yes, we need to play the right chords, have a great mix, etc. But that is not the primary objective.

  5. Enjoyed meeting you this week. The “Mythbuster” discussion was great. Specific to this entry, as we discussed in the breakout, my primary metric for effectivness of a worship service is this: was God worshipped?
    I think if we can say “yes” to that, the rest is just stuff. Yes, we need to play the right chords, have a great mix, etc. But that is not the primary objective.

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