Contemplations & Conversations on Creative Leadership: “Too Good” Part 4

This is Part 4 of 4 in a series… 

Summary

Psalm 33:3 says, “Sing to him a new song; play skillfully and shout for joy.”

This Bible verse if often quoted by those of us who lead worship and worship teams because it both talks about the fact of being creative (new song) and of excellence (play skillfully). When someone says you are “too good” might they be saying that you should not change how things are done?  Or, could the message be that skill does not matter enough to have the best possible talent play in your worship team?

I believe that “joy” is one of the most envied of all fruits when it comes to creating something as an artist. Joy does not exclude pain, suffering, and hard work. It does not mean anything will come easy. And when creating something new or different it means you are subject to critique far harsher than if you simply lay low and keep the status quo. On top of that, using your God-given skill in a way that shows not just the passion but effective results will not always win you fans.

The “too good” is a fight artists and creatives fight because the other option is to have all the suffering, pain and hard work but none of the joy of it. My prayer is that we learn as leaders, especially in the local church setting to look for the fruit of joy that comes when creatives create–even if it is something some people label as “too good”.

Here are some thoughts to summarize “too good”:

  • We are afraid to be “too good” because it might feel too good.
  • Just because the work’s creation process is not visible, does not mean it is non-existent.
  • Using the best people you can is a great idea. It’s called putting people where they are meant to be and it works.
  • We homogenize rather than synergize.
  • Too good means fighting for authentic expression rather than boilerplate.
  • We must be careful to not “win” at the expense of someone else.

I would love to converse with you about this! What say you about “too good”?

 

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

8 comments

  1. Hey, Rich
    I know it’s been a while since you posted this series, but I’ve really enjoyed it and been thinking about it. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and insight. The challenge is what to do about it when in a setting where you spend a lot of time up against the “we want to offer our best” on one side and the “good enough” thing on the other side. Or the, “let’s do good, as long as it doesn’t take time much prep or practice.” How do you respond to the “we want everyone to have a chance to be involved” thing, which means if they have any perceived amount of musical ability, the first thought is to get them on the worship team?

    1. Chris…Hasn’t been that long!;)
      I think the main question is this: “What is the role and win of the worship team?”

      If it is to lead people in worship, then its purpose is not so people can use their gifts. The pulpit is not there for the pastor to use his teaching gift. His teaching gift happens to fit with the pulpit. The platform of worship leadership does not exist to allow worship leaders to lead, but those gifted to do so are designed to be on that platform.

      So, if my worship team member says “I am tired of the music” but the church worships better with repetition, who do I listen to? I have to ask the worship team member to “serve” the congregation.

      Make sense?

  2. Hey, Rich
    I know it’s been a while since you posted this series, but I’ve really enjoyed it and been thinking about it. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and insight. The challenge is what to do about it when in a setting where you spend a lot of time up against the “we want to offer our best” on one side and the “good enough” thing on the other side. Or the, “let’s do good, as long as it doesn’t take time much prep or practice.” How do you respond to the “we want everyone to have a chance to be involved” thing, which means if they have any perceived amount of musical ability, the first thought is to get them on the worship team?

    1. Chris…Hasn’t been that long!;)
      I think the main question is this: “What is the role and win of the worship team?”

      If it is to lead people in worship, then its purpose is not so people can use their gifts. The pulpit is not there for the pastor to use his teaching gift. His teaching gift happens to fit with the pulpit. The platform of worship leadership does not exist to allow worship leaders to lead, but those gifted to do so are designed to be on that platform.

      So, if my worship team member says “I am tired of the music” but the church worships better with repetition, who do I listen to? I have to ask the worship team member to “serve” the congregation.

      Make sense?

  3. Hey, Rich
    I know it’s been a while since you posted this series, but I’ve really enjoyed it and been thinking about it. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and insight. The challenge is what to do about it when in a setting where you spend a lot of time up against the “we want to offer our best” on one side and the “good enough” thing on the other side. Or the, “let’s do good, as long as it doesn’t take time much prep or practice.” How do you respond to the “we want everyone to have a chance to be involved” thing, which means if they have any perceived amount of musical ability, the first thought is to get them on the worship team?

    1. Chris…Hasn’t been that long!;)
      I think the main question is this: “What is the role and win of the worship team?”

      If it is to lead people in worship, then its purpose is not so people can use their gifts. The pulpit is not there for the pastor to use his teaching gift. His teaching gift happens to fit with the pulpit. The platform of worship leadership does not exist to allow worship leaders to lead, but those gifted to do so are designed to be on that platform.

      So, if my worship team member says “I am tired of the music” but the church worships better with repetition, who do I listen to? I have to ask the worship team member to “serve” the congregation.

      Make sense?

  4. Hey, Rich
    I know it’s been a while since you posted this series, but I’ve really enjoyed it and been thinking about it. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and insight. The challenge is what to do about it when in a setting where you spend a lot of time up against the “we want to offer our best” on one side and the “good enough” thing on the other side. Or the, “let’s do good, as long as it doesn’t take time much prep or practice.” How do you respond to the “we want everyone to have a chance to be involved” thing, which means if they have any perceived amount of musical ability, the first thought is to get them on the worship team?

    1. Chris…Hasn’t been that long!;)
      I think the main question is this: “What is the role and win of the worship team?”

      If it is to lead people in worship, then its purpose is not so people can use their gifts. The pulpit is not there for the pastor to use his teaching gift. His teaching gift happens to fit with the pulpit. The platform of worship leadership does not exist to allow worship leaders to lead, but those gifted to do so are designed to be on that platform.

      So, if my worship team member says “I am tired of the music” but the church worships better with repetition, who do I listen to? I have to ask the worship team member to “serve” the congregation.

      Make sense?

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