NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED! – How do you feel about rules?

Rules make something inside of us stir. This sign made me want to go out and buy a longboard skateboard and skinny jeans and ride proudly down the streets of Temecula. I could see how silly someone of my age would be doing this and then standing before the judge explaining how I got the citation. The question of what rules do in us is raised in scripture.

Romans 7:8 says that sin “seized opportunity through the commandment” in us the desire to break rules–essentially a definition of “sin”. Rules, when presented to us, make us want to break rules. The Bible really knows us well! The issue is not that rules or law are bad, it is that we are and in need of a heart transplant only Jesus can give.

What are your thoughts about rules and what they stir in you?

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

60 comments

  1. Rule? What rules? I guess I already broke them. So, not a fan really. Except maybe on the freeway.

  2. I know that we are supposed to submit to the authority over us, and follow the rules. However, in my opinion, some rules are stupid. That doesn’t mean we should break them. I always wonder how far over the speed limit Christ would go, is 5 mph over ok? Or is that still a sin, I only bring it up because I am always convicted by that, maybe we should all drive more like Grandparents? I’m rambling, my apoligies.

  3. I know that we are supposed to submit to the authority over us, and follow the rules. However, in my opinion, some rules are stupid. That doesn’t mean we should break them. I always wonder how far over the speed limit Christ would go, is 5 mph over ok? Or is that still a sin, I only bring it up because I am always convicted by that, maybe we should all drive more like Grandparents? I’m rambling, my apoligies.

  4. I know that we are supposed to submit to the authority over us, and follow the rules. However, in my opinion, some rules are stupid. That doesn’t mean we should break them. I always wonder how far over the speed limit Christ would go, is 5 mph over ok? Or is that still a sin, I only bring it up because I am always convicted by that, maybe we should all drive more like Grandparents? I’m rambling, my apoligies.

  5. I know that we are supposed to submit to the authority over us, and follow the rules. However, in my opinion, some rules are stupid. That doesn’t mean we should break them. I always wonder how far over the speed limit Christ would go, is 5 mph over ok? Or is that still a sin, I only bring it up because I am always convicted by that, maybe we should all drive more like Grandparents? I’m rambling, my apoligies.

  6. I know that we are supposed to submit to the authority over us, and follow the rules. However, in my opinion, some rules are stupid. That doesn’t mean we should break them. I always wonder how far over the speed limit Christ would go, is 5 mph over ok? Or is that still a sin, I only bring it up because I am always convicted by that, maybe we should all drive more like Grandparents? I’m rambling, my apoligies.

  7. Rules, ok I hate them. They make me want to do the opposite. Yet I really believe that if people treated others how they want to be treated, loved each other, showed kindness, patience self control etc., then most rules would be silly. Because the skate boarder would respect those walking, the cell phone user would step outside the theater, gum would be thrown in the trash can and driving would be pleasant because no one would cut in line or drive up your rump or cut you off. Probably less accidents and road rage as well. But bottom line is I’m full of sin, it only takes a moment for me to get angry, selfish or just plain “its all about me today.” So I guess I need rules to keep me in check. I wish I didn’t. I spent many years fighting and breaking as many rules as possible. So now the rules allow me to seek out their purpose instead of just bucking the system.

  8. Rules, ok I hate them. They make me want to do the opposite. Yet I really believe that if people treated others how they want to be treated, loved each other, showed kindness, patience self control etc., then most rules would be silly. Because the skate boarder would respect those walking, the cell phone user would step outside the theater, gum would be thrown in the trash can and driving would be pleasant because no one would cut in line or drive up your rump or cut you off. Probably less accidents and road rage as well. But bottom line is I’m full of sin, it only takes a moment for me to get angry, selfish or just plain “its all about me today.” So I guess I need rules to keep me in check. I wish I didn’t. I spent many years fighting and breaking as many rules as possible. So now the rules allow me to seek out their purpose instead of just bucking the system.

  9. Rules, ok I hate them. They make me want to do the opposite. Yet I really believe that if people treated others how they want to be treated, loved each other, showed kindness, patience self control etc., then most rules would be silly. Because the skate boarder would respect those walking, the cell phone user would step outside the theater, gum would be thrown in the trash can and driving would be pleasant because no one would cut in line or drive up your rump or cut you off. Probably less accidents and road rage as well. But bottom line is I’m full of sin, it only takes a moment for me to get angry, selfish or just plain “its all about me today.” So I guess I need rules to keep me in check. I wish I didn’t. I spent many years fighting and breaking as many rules as possible. So now the rules allow me to seek out their purpose instead of just bucking the system.

  10. Rules, ok I hate them. They make me want to do the opposite. Yet I really believe that if people treated others how they want to be treated, loved each other, showed kindness, patience self control etc., then most rules would be silly. Because the skate boarder would respect those walking, the cell phone user would step outside the theater, gum would be thrown in the trash can and driving would be pleasant because no one would cut in line or drive up your rump or cut you off. Probably less accidents and road rage as well. But bottom line is I’m full of sin, it only takes a moment for me to get angry, selfish or just plain “its all about me today.” So I guess I need rules to keep me in check. I wish I didn’t. I spent many years fighting and breaking as many rules as possible. So now the rules allow me to seek out their purpose instead of just bucking the system.

  11. Rules, ok I hate them. They make me want to do the opposite. Yet I really believe that if people treated others how they want to be treated, loved each other, showed kindness, patience self control etc., then most rules would be silly. Because the skate boarder would respect those walking, the cell phone user would step outside the theater, gum would be thrown in the trash can and driving would be pleasant because no one would cut in line or drive up your rump or cut you off. Probably less accidents and road rage as well. But bottom line is I’m full of sin, it only takes a moment for me to get angry, selfish or just plain “its all about me today.” So I guess I need rules to keep me in check. I wish I didn’t. I spent many years fighting and breaking as many rules as possible. So now the rules allow me to seek out their purpose instead of just bucking the system.

  12. The thing about rules is that, more often than not, they require an explanation, and a face of a person willing to stand up for it.
    Most travelers would like to know who made the rule that bans wifi from international flights. Why? What’s the man’s name who wrote that rule? Where does he live, so that we can stand outside his house with large signs, or maybe his place of business rallying against unnecessary stupidity, or lobby to have people like him fired?

    These sort of rules are like anonymous commenters on the internet who will bash anything and hide behind little 1s and 0s on their side of the computer screen. Allowing people to remain faceless gives them the license to be snide, condescending, rude little trolls that are having delusions of adequacy and power. Its the same in organizations. Troll-like middle-management types like to make up lots of rules to seem more important than they actually really are.

  13. The thing about rules is that, more often than not, they require an explanation, and a face of a person willing to stand up for it.
    Most travelers would like to know who made the rule that bans wifi from international flights. Why? What’s the man’s name who wrote that rule? Where does he live, so that we can stand outside his house with large signs, or maybe his place of business rallying against unnecessary stupidity, or lobby to have people like him fired?
    These sort of rules are like anonymous commenters on the internet who will bash anything and hide behind little 1s and 0s on their side of the computer screen. Allowing people to remain faceless gives them the license to be snide, condescending, rude little trolls that are having delusions of adequacy and power. Its the same in organizations. Troll-like middle-management types like to make up lots of rules to seem more important than they actually really are.

  14. The thing about rules is that, more often than not, they require an explanation, and a face of a person willing to stand up for it.
    Most travelers would like to know who made the rule that bans wifi from international flights. Why? What’s the man’s name who wrote that rule? Where does he live, so that we can stand outside his house with large signs, or maybe his place of business rallying against unnecessary stupidity, or lobby to have people like him fired?

    These sort of rules are like anonymous commenters on the internet who will bash anything and hide behind little 1s and 0s on their side of the computer screen. Allowing people to remain faceless gives them the license to be snide, condescending, rude little trolls that are having delusions of adequacy and power. Its the same in organizations. Troll-like middle-management types like to make up lots of rules to seem more important than they actually really are.

  15. The thing about rules is that, more often than not, they require an explanation, and a face of a person willing to stand up for it.
    Most travelers would like to know who made the rule that bans wifi from international flights. Why? What’s the man’s name who wrote that rule? Where does he live, so that we can stand outside his house with large signs, or maybe his place of business rallying against unnecessary stupidity, or lobby to have people like him fired?

    These sort of rules are like anonymous commenters on the internet who will bash anything and hide behind little 1s and 0s on their side of the computer screen. Allowing people to remain faceless gives them the license to be snide, condescending, rude little trolls that are having delusions of adequacy and power. Its the same in organizations. Troll-like middle-management types like to make up lots of rules to seem more important than they actually really are.

  16. The thing about rules is that, more often than not, they require an explanation, and a face of a person willing to stand up for it.
    Most travelers would like to know who made the rule that bans wifi from international flights. Why? What’s the man’s name who wrote that rule? Where does he live, so that we can stand outside his house with large signs, or maybe his place of business rallying against unnecessary stupidity, or lobby to have people like him fired?

    These sort of rules are like anonymous commenters on the internet who will bash anything and hide behind little 1s and 0s on their side of the computer screen. Allowing people to remain faceless gives them the license to be snide, condescending, rude little trolls that are having delusions of adequacy and power. Its the same in organizations. Troll-like middle-management types like to make up lots of rules to seem more important than they actually really are.

  17. You provide a very Pauline understanding of rules, especially the way he speaks in Romans about rules bringing out his desire to disobey them. I try not to think of rules like this.
    There have been those in the church throughout history who have created things such as monastic orders where people voluntarily enter into community with others under a common rule or “order” (the ‘order’ is made up of a series of rules). The people in these communities formed these orders over centuries of trial and error. In the same way, we, by trial and error, create particular Christian communities where we live and breathe together, and rub shoulders.

    Rubbing shoulders is a sometimes uncomfortable experience that all Christians should experience (especially at the eucharist).

  18. You provide a very Pauline understanding of rules, especially the way he speaks in Romans about rules bringing out his desire to disobey them. I try not to think of rules like this.
    There have been those in the church throughout history who have created things such as monastic orders where people voluntarily enter into community with others under a common rule or “order” (the ‘order’ is made up of a series of rules). The people in these communities formed these orders over centuries of trial and error. In the same way, we, by trial and error, create particular Christian communities where we live and breathe together, and rub shoulders.
    Rubbing shoulders is a sometimes uncomfortable experience that all Christians should experience (especially at the eucharist).

  19. You provide a very Pauline understanding of rules, especially the way he speaks in Romans about rules bringing out his desire to disobey them. I try not to think of rules like this.
    There have been those in the church throughout history who have created things such as monastic orders where people voluntarily enter into community with others under a common rule or “order” (the ‘order’ is made up of a series of rules). The people in these communities formed these orders over centuries of trial and error. In the same way, we, by trial and error, create particular Christian communities where we live and breathe together, and rub shoulders.

    Rubbing shoulders is a sometimes uncomfortable experience that all Christians should experience (especially at the eucharist).

  20. You provide a very Pauline understanding of rules, especially the way he speaks in Romans about rules bringing out his desire to disobey them. I try not to think of rules like this.
    There have been those in the church throughout history who have created things such as monastic orders where people voluntarily enter into community with others under a common rule or “order” (the ‘order’ is made up of a series of rules). The people in these communities formed these orders over centuries of trial and error. In the same way, we, by trial and error, create particular Christian communities where we live and breathe together, and rub shoulders.

    Rubbing shoulders is a sometimes uncomfortable experience that all Christians should experience (especially at the eucharist).

  21. You provide a very Pauline understanding of rules, especially the way he speaks in Romans about rules bringing out his desire to disobey them. I try not to think of rules like this.
    There have been those in the church throughout history who have created things such as monastic orders where people voluntarily enter into community with others under a common rule or “order” (the ‘order’ is made up of a series of rules). The people in these communities formed these orders over centuries of trial and error. In the same way, we, by trial and error, create particular Christian communities where we live and breathe together, and rub shoulders.

    Rubbing shoulders is a sometimes uncomfortable experience that all Christians should experience (especially at the eucharist).

  22. In regard to the “No Skateboarding” sign in particular, most of the churches in our small town have these signs, but there is no legal place for the teenagers to skate. So, yes, the kids do break the rules, but only because they aren’t welcome anywhere.

  23. In regard to the “No Skateboarding” sign in particular, most of the churches in our small town have these signs, but there is no legal place for the teenagers to skate. So, yes, the kids do break the rules, but only because they aren’t welcome anywhere.

  24. In regard to the “No Skateboarding” sign in particular, most of the churches in our small town have these signs, but there is no legal place for the teenagers to skate. So, yes, the kids do break the rules, but only because they aren’t welcome anywhere.

  25. In regard to the “No Skateboarding” sign in particular, most of the churches in our small town have these signs, but there is no legal place for the teenagers to skate. So, yes, the kids do break the rules, but only because they aren’t welcome anywhere.

  26. In regard to the “No Skateboarding” sign in particular, most of the churches in our small town have these signs, but there is no legal place for the teenagers to skate. So, yes, the kids do break the rules, but only because they aren’t welcome anywhere.

  27. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Rich Kirkpatrick and Rich Kirkpatrick, highcallingblog. highcallingblog said: RT @rkweblog: In case you missed it… NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED! – How do you feel about rules? http://tinyurl.com/ydap8gt […]

  28. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Rich Kirkpatrick and Rich Kirkpatrick, highcallingblog. highcallingblog said: RT @rkweblog: In case you missed it… NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED! – How do you feel about rules? http://tinyurl.com/ydap8gt […]

  29. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Rich Kirkpatrick and Rich Kirkpatrick, highcallingblog. highcallingblog said: RT @rkweblog: In case you missed it… NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED! – How do you feel about rules? http://tinyurl.com/ydap8gt […]

  30. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Rich Kirkpatrick and Rich Kirkpatrick, highcallingblog. highcallingblog said: RT @rkweblog: In case you missed it… NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED! – How do you feel about rules? http://tinyurl.com/ydap8gt […]

  31. Some of the great questions regarding rules are: who makes them, who has a right to make them, who can decide when the rules must be broken.Let me give some examples from the world of Judaism and Christianity.
    — When Moses received the ten commandments one of them was (and still is): thou shalt not kill. But when the Israelites started the conquest of the Holy Land under Moses’ successor, God ordered them to killl all the inhabitants, including completely innocent women and children. And God was very angry when the Isaelites spared the lives of some. Is not this a little strange?
    — Like I said: one of the commandments is: thou shalt not kill. But one lesson that is to be found throughout the Bible is that God intends to totally destroy (=kill) all the people that have refused to obey his laws and who cannot be admitted into his heavenly kingdom at the end of time. Is not this a little strange?
    — Are Christians allowed to kill their enemies in wars that the governments of their countries have engaged in? For instance: are American and Eurpean soldiers who fight the Taliban and Al Quaida in Iraq and Aphganistan allowed to kill their enemies? If so, is not this a little strange?

    1. I think your points lead to the main point of Christianity–why was Jesus killed, or did God allow him to be killed? As a side note, “murder” in court is different than justified homicide or accidental death. Back to the question I will give you.
      This is what we call the “penal substitution” where Jesus took God’s wrath for all mankind–regardless of gender, nationality or ethnicity. Truly, the death of Jesus was the final act. It covers all of those who believe and follow Jesus. Its the only religion that God provides the work–not the worshiper. All of man is fallen. All of man needs this gift and covering of Jesus.

      When it comes to justified war, its the same as the right a man has to protect his household from harm–difference between murder of innocents like the Al Queda blowing up kids and a soldier fighting a soldier. America was declared war upon and innocents–not soldiers–were killed. In this case, war is justified to protect the innocents just as law enforcement has a right to subdue those who are bent on causing harm to a community on our very street.

      Murder is wrong. Killing is not good. But, obviously in all religions and cultures a common thread is that self-protection is justified while killing innocents is wrong. In this way, the Bible is very true and consistent and not strange at all.

  32. Some of the great questions regarding rules are: who makes them, who has a right to make them, who can decide when the rules must be broken.Let me give some examples from the world of Judaism and Christianity.
    — When Moses received the ten commandments one of them was (and still is): thou shalt not kill. But when the Israelites started the conquest of the Holy Land under Moses’ successor, God ordered them to killl all the inhabitants, including completely innocent women and children. And God was very angry when the Isaelites spared the lives of some. Is not this a little strange?
    — Like I said: one of the commandments is: thou shalt not kill. But one lesson that is to be found throughout the Bible is that God intends to totally destroy (=kill) all the people that have refused to obey his laws and who cannot be admitted into his heavenly kingdom at the end of time. Is not this a little strange?
    — Are Christians allowed to kill their enemies in wars that the governments of their countries have engaged in? For instance: are American and Eurpean soldiers who fight the Taliban and Al Quaida in Iraq and Aphganistan allowed to kill their enemies? If so, is not this a little strange?

    1. I think your points lead to the main point of Christianity–why was Jesus killed, or did God allow him to be killed? As a side note, “murder” in court is different than justified homicide or accidental death. Back to the question I will give you.
      This is what we call the “penal substitution” where Jesus took God’s wrath for all mankind–regardless of gender, nationality or ethnicity. Truly, the death of Jesus was the final act. It covers all of those who believe and follow Jesus. Its the only religion that God provides the work–not the worshiper. All of man is fallen. All of man needs this gift and covering of Jesus.
      When it comes to justified war, its the same as the right a man has to protect his household from harm–difference between murder of innocents like the Al Queda blowing up kids and a soldier fighting a soldier. America was declared war upon and innocents–not soldiers–were killed. In this case, war is justified to protect the innocents just as law enforcement has a right to subdue those who are bent on causing harm to a community on our very street.
      Murder is wrong. Killing is not good. But, obviously in all religions and cultures a common thread is that self-protection is justified while killing innocents is wrong. In this way, the Bible is very true and consistent and not strange at all.

  33. Some of the great questions regarding rules are: who makes them, who has a right to make them, who can decide when the rules must be broken.Let me give some examples from the world of Judaism and Christianity.
    — When Moses received the ten commandments one of them was (and still is): thou shalt not kill. But when the Israelites started the conquest of the Holy Land under Moses’ successor, God ordered them to killl all the inhabitants, including completely innocent women and children. And God was very angry when the Isaelites spared the lives of some. Is not this a little strange?
    — Like I said: one of the commandments is: thou shalt not kill. But one lesson that is to be found throughout the Bible is that God intends to totally destroy (=kill) all the people that have refused to obey his laws and who cannot be admitted into his heavenly kingdom at the end of time. Is not this a little strange?
    — Are Christians allowed to kill their enemies in wars that the governments of their countries have engaged in? For instance: are American and Eurpean soldiers who fight the Taliban and Al Quaida in Iraq and Aphganistan allowed to kill their enemies? If so, is not this a little strange?

    1. I think your points lead to the main point of Christianity–why was Jesus killed, or did God allow him to be killed? As a side note, “murder” in court is different than justified homicide or accidental death. Back to the question I will give you.
      This is what we call the “penal substitution” where Jesus took God’s wrath for all mankind–regardless of gender, nationality or ethnicity. Truly, the death of Jesus was the final act. It covers all of those who believe and follow Jesus. Its the only religion that God provides the work–not the worshiper. All of man is fallen. All of man needs this gift and covering of Jesus.

      When it comes to justified war, its the same as the right a man has to protect his household from harm–difference between murder of innocents like the Al Queda blowing up kids and a soldier fighting a soldier. America was declared war upon and innocents–not soldiers–were killed. In this case, war is justified to protect the innocents just as law enforcement has a right to subdue those who are bent on causing harm to a community on our very street.

      Murder is wrong. Killing is not good. But, obviously in all religions and cultures a common thread is that self-protection is justified while killing innocents is wrong. In this way, the Bible is very true and consistent and not strange at all.

  34. Some of the great questions regarding rules are: who makes them, who has a right to make them, who can decide when the rules must be broken.Let me give some examples from the world of Judaism and Christianity.
    — When Moses received the ten commandments one of them was (and still is): thou shalt not kill. But when the Israelites started the conquest of the Holy Land under Moses’ successor, God ordered them to killl all the inhabitants, including completely innocent women and children. And God was very angry when the Isaelites spared the lives of some. Is not this a little strange?
    — Like I said: one of the commandments is: thou shalt not kill. But one lesson that is to be found throughout the Bible is that God intends to totally destroy (=kill) all the people that have refused to obey his laws and who cannot be admitted into his heavenly kingdom at the end of time. Is not this a little strange?
    — Are Christians allowed to kill their enemies in wars that the governments of their countries have engaged in? For instance: are American and Eurpean soldiers who fight the Taliban and Al Quaida in Iraq and Aphganistan allowed to kill their enemies? If so, is not this a little strange?

    1. I think your points lead to the main point of Christianity–why was Jesus killed, or did God allow him to be killed? As a side note, “murder” in court is different than justified homicide or accidental death. Back to the question I will give you.
      This is what we call the “penal substitution” where Jesus took God’s wrath for all mankind–regardless of gender, nationality or ethnicity. Truly, the death of Jesus was the final act. It covers all of those who believe and follow Jesus. Its the only religion that God provides the work–not the worshiper. All of man is fallen. All of man needs this gift and covering of Jesus.

      When it comes to justified war, its the same as the right a man has to protect his household from harm–difference between murder of innocents like the Al Queda blowing up kids and a soldier fighting a soldier. America was declared war upon and innocents–not soldiers–were killed. In this case, war is justified to protect the innocents just as law enforcement has a right to subdue those who are bent on causing harm to a community on our very street.

      Murder is wrong. Killing is not good. But, obviously in all religions and cultures a common thread is that self-protection is justified while killing innocents is wrong. In this way, the Bible is very true and consistent and not strange at all.

  35. Some of the great questions regarding rules are: who makes them, who has a right to make them, who can decide when the rules must be broken.Let me give some examples from the world of Judaism and Christianity.
    — When Moses received the ten commandments one of them was (and still is): thou shalt not kill. But when the Israelites started the conquest of the Holy Land under Moses’ successor, God ordered them to killl all the inhabitants, including completely innocent women and children. And God was very angry when the Isaelites spared the lives of some. Is not this a little strange?
    — Like I said: one of the commandments is: thou shalt not kill. But one lesson that is to be found throughout the Bible is that God intends to totally destroy (=kill) all the people that have refused to obey his laws and who cannot be admitted into his heavenly kingdom at the end of time. Is not this a little strange?
    — Are Christians allowed to kill their enemies in wars that the governments of their countries have engaged in? For instance: are American and Eurpean soldiers who fight the Taliban and Al Quaida in Iraq and Aphganistan allowed to kill their enemies? If so, is not this a little strange?

    1. I think your points lead to the main point of Christianity–why was Jesus killed, or did God allow him to be killed? As a side note, “murder” in court is different than justified homicide or accidental death. Back to the question I will give you.
      This is what we call the “penal substitution” where Jesus took God’s wrath for all mankind–regardless of gender, nationality or ethnicity. Truly, the death of Jesus was the final act. It covers all of those who believe and follow Jesus. Its the only religion that God provides the work–not the worshiper. All of man is fallen. All of man needs this gift and covering of Jesus.

      When it comes to justified war, its the same as the right a man has to protect his household from harm–difference between murder of innocents like the Al Queda blowing up kids and a soldier fighting a soldier. America was declared war upon and innocents–not soldiers–were killed. In this case, war is justified to protect the innocents just as law enforcement has a right to subdue those who are bent on causing harm to a community on our very street.

      Murder is wrong. Killing is not good. But, obviously in all religions and cultures a common thread is that self-protection is justified while killing innocents is wrong. In this way, the Bible is very true and consistent and not strange at all.

  36. Dear Rich,Thanks for your quick reaction and your wise words. You have completely convinced me.
    Actually I was just writing down some thoughts that entered my mind in the course of the years and that came up again when I read the NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED article.
    I also agree with you that the Bible, though written by more than 40 authors in the course of some 1600 years, never contradicts itself and is consistent from the first verses of Genesis to the last verses of Revelation.

  37. Dear Rich,Thanks for your quick reaction and your wise words. You have completely convinced me.
    Actually I was just writing down some thoughts that entered my mind in the course of the years and that came up again when I read the NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED article.
    I also agree with you that the Bible, though written by more than 40 authors in the course of some 1600 years, never contradicts itself and is consistent from the first verses of Genesis to the last verses of Revelation.

  38. Dear Rich,Thanks for your quick reaction and your wise words. You have completely convinced me.
    Actually I was just writing down some thoughts that entered my mind in the course of the years and that came up again when I read the NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED article.
    I also agree with you that the Bible, though written by more than 40 authors in the course of some 1600 years, never contradicts itself and is consistent from the first verses of Genesis to the last verses of Revelation.

  39. Dear Rich,Thanks for your quick reaction and your wise words. You have completely convinced me.
    Actually I was just writing down some thoughts that entered my mind in the course of the years and that came up again when I read the NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED article.
    I also agree with you that the Bible, though written by more than 40 authors in the course of some 1600 years, never contradicts itself and is consistent from the first verses of Genesis to the last verses of Revelation.

  40. Dear Rich,Thanks for your quick reaction and your wise words. You have completely convinced me.
    Actually I was just writing down some thoughts that entered my mind in the course of the years and that came up again when I read the NO SKATEBOARDING ALLOWED article.
    I also agree with you that the Bible, though written by more than 40 authors in the course of some 1600 years, never contradicts itself and is consistent from the first verses of Genesis to the last verses of Revelation.

  41. I would like to throw my 2 cents in that the hebrew word used for “to kill” in the 10 commandements is actually translated as “to murder”. There are many words used to depict the ending of life in Hebrew.

  42. I would like to throw my 2 cents in that the hebrew word used for “to kill” in the 10 commandements is actually translated as “to murder”. There are many words used to depict the ending of life in Hebrew.

  43. I would like to throw my 2 cents in that the hebrew word used for “to kill” in the 10 commandements is actually translated as “to murder”. There are many words used to depict the ending of life in Hebrew.

  44. I would like to throw my 2 cents in that the hebrew word used for “to kill” in the 10 commandements is actually translated as “to murder”. There are many words used to depict the ending of life in Hebrew.

  45. I would like to throw my 2 cents in that the hebrew word used for “to kill” in the 10 commandements is actually translated as “to murder”. There are many words used to depict the ending of life in Hebrew.

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