Are you texting, twittering or reading the Bible at church with that smart phone?

BibleGateway.com is a favorite site for those who read the Bible online as is YouVersion.com. But, if you are reading the Bible during church from your mobile phone is that a problem? Well, I think not. As you can see from the stats from BibleGateway.com’s blog based on Sunday views there are quite a few others that agree with me.

By the way, besides http://m.youversion.com/ go to http://mobile.biblegateway.com/ to charge up the Bible on your phone!

So, what do you think. Is reading a Bible online during a church service a good thing? Are traditional paper Bibles better or what?

HT: ThinkChristian.net

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

12 comments

  1. Well in the computer age society that we live in now, it is not really a surprise that people would preferably read the Bible online as opposed to taking out the paper version of the Bible. As far as reading it during a church service…I think that it could pose as a distraction. If you are already on your phone to read the Bible, you might be tempted to browse a bit since you already have your phone out. This could also distract the person preaching as they see you with a phone in hand not knowing that you are in fact reading the Bible. There is also something to be said about having the Bible (in book form) right in front of you so you can underline, highlight, circle etc. It also poses the question…have we become to dependent on technology?

    1. Just think, the Bible was not available like it is today and used to cost a years wages for those that had one. In a way, we can call the printing press a technology, too. So, the pluses out weigh not having the Bible in the hands of people. Now, I can have it in several translations anywhere, anytime–as long as I have battery life that is. 🙂

  2. Well in the computer age society that we live in now, it is not really a surprise that people would preferably read the Bible online as opposed to taking out the paper version of the Bible. As far as reading it during a church service…I think that it could pose as a distraction. If you are already on your phone to read the Bible, you might be tempted to browse a bit since you already have your phone out. This could also distract the person preaching as they see you with a phone in hand not knowing that you are in fact reading the Bible. There is also something to be said about having the Bible (in book form) right in front of you so you can underline, highlight, circle etc. It also poses the question…have we become to dependent on technology?

    1. Just think, the Bible was not available like it is today and used to cost a years wages for those that had one. In a way, we can call the printing press a technology, too. So, the pluses out weigh not having the Bible in the hands of people. Now, I can have it in several translations anywhere, anytime–as long as I have battery life that is. 🙂

  3. Well in the computer age society that we live in now, it is not really a surprise that people would preferably read the Bible online as opposed to taking out the paper version of the Bible. As far as reading it during a church service…I think that it could pose as a distraction. If you are already on your phone to read the Bible, you might be tempted to browse a bit since you already have your phone out. This could also distract the person preaching as they see you with a phone in hand not knowing that you are in fact reading the Bible. There is also something to be said about having the Bible (in book form) right in front of you so you can underline, highlight, circle etc. It also poses the question…have we become to dependent on technology?

    1. Just think, the Bible was not available like it is today and used to cost a years wages for those that had one. In a way, we can call the printing press a technology, too. So, the pluses out weigh not having the Bible in the hands of people. Now, I can have it in several translations anywhere, anytime–as long as I have battery life that is. 🙂

  4. Well in the computer age society that we live in now, it is not really a surprise that people would preferably read the Bible online as opposed to taking out the paper version of the Bible. As far as reading it during a church service…I think that it could pose as a distraction. If you are already on your phone to read the Bible, you might be tempted to browse a bit since you already have your phone out. This could also distract the person preaching as they see you with a phone in hand not knowing that you are in fact reading the Bible. There is also something to be said about having the Bible (in book form) right in front of you so you can underline, highlight, circle etc. It also poses the question…have we become to dependent on technology?

    1. Just think, the Bible was not available like it is today and used to cost a years wages for those that had one. In a way, we can call the printing press a technology, too. So, the pluses out weigh not having the Bible in the hands of people. Now, I can have it in several translations anywhere, anytime–as long as I have battery life that is. 🙂

  5. I have no problem with it, but I will never put down my paper Bible and replace it with an electronic one.
    My Bible has highlighted verses, notes from sermons or Bible studies, and clarifications that I’ve put in (mostly when I didn’t know a word, or when the same Greek word is translated as 2+ English ones).

    Kelly makes a legitimate point about temptation, but I do know a guy who reads his Bible online during church, and he’s good about staying focused.

  6. I have no problem with it, but I will never put down my paper Bible and replace it with an electronic one.
    My Bible has highlighted verses, notes from sermons or Bible studies, and clarifications that I’ve put in (mostly when I didn’t know a word, or when the same Greek word is translated as 2+ English ones).

    Kelly makes a legitimate point about temptation, but I do know a guy who reads his Bible online during church, and he’s good about staying focused.

  7. I have no problem with it, but I will never put down my paper Bible and replace it with an electronic one.
    My Bible has highlighted verses, notes from sermons or Bible studies, and clarifications that I’ve put in (mostly when I didn’t know a word, or when the same Greek word is translated as 2+ English ones).

    Kelly makes a legitimate point about temptation, but I do know a guy who reads his Bible online during church, and he’s good about staying focused.

  8. I have no problem with it, but I will never put down my paper Bible and replace it with an electronic one.
    My Bible has highlighted verses, notes from sermons or Bible studies, and clarifications that I’ve put in (mostly when I didn’t know a word, or when the same Greek word is translated as 2+ English ones).

    Kelly makes a legitimate point about temptation, but I do know a guy who reads his Bible online during church, and he’s good about staying focused.

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