Leadership: I am a leader, and I have the scars to prove it!

Yes, I am a leader and I have the scars to prove it. If you are in leadership, then you obviously know what I mean. To put yourself out in front often means taking the bullet and flack first. If you are not out in front, then you are not really leading.

Scars are the authenticating marks of faithful discipleship and true spiritual leadership–Oswald Sanders

Sanders states here a reality that our leader-entitlement culture is hard pressed to embrace. In an age of golden parachutes during an economic crisis, are we as spiritual leaders whining about the pain and scars of our leadership or are we willing to sacrifice for the good of those we lead our legitimate desires?

The first and only point here is that leading will scar you. Leading will be painful, lonely and cost even those closest to you. If you and I are not willing to pay a higher price than the pack, we are not a leader of the pack. We may have the title, salary, and position but a leader we are not!

So, I think we can choose to wear our scars and be content that the price of seeing people come to faith in Jesus and grow more like Him is worth it.

Discuss: should we accept the pain and scars, or isolate and protect ourselves and those closest to us from the cost of leading? Is NO PAIN NO GAIN really for me as a leader?

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Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

24 comments

  1. Scars are cool 🙂
    I think this is a great thought today, Rich.

    I’ve watched my parents over the course of a 25+ year ministry career and believe me it is filled with a ton of hurts. Of course, there’s also a ton of joy and great memories too.

    I think it’s important to have both.

    In fact, I seem to remember James writing that we should find joy in trials and tribulations because they build character.

    good post.

  2. Scars are cool 🙂
    I think this is a great thought today, Rich.

    I’ve watched my parents over the course of a 25+ year ministry career and believe me it is filled with a ton of hurts. Of course, there’s also a ton of joy and great memories too.

    I think it’s important to have both.

    In fact, I seem to remember James writing that we should find joy in trials and tribulations because they build character.

    good post.

  3. Scars are cool 🙂
    I think this is a great thought today, Rich.

    I’ve watched my parents over the course of a 25+ year ministry career and believe me it is filled with a ton of hurts. Of course, there’s also a ton of joy and great memories too.

    I think it’s important to have both.

    In fact, I seem to remember James writing that we should find joy in trials and tribulations because they build character.

    good post.

  4. Scars are cool 🙂
    I think this is a great thought today, Rich.

    I’ve watched my parents over the course of a 25+ year ministry career and believe me it is filled with a ton of hurts. Of course, there’s also a ton of joy and great memories too.

    I think it’s important to have both.

    In fact, I seem to remember James writing that we should find joy in trials and tribulations because they build character.

    good post.

  5. I think scars are, in some senses, inevitable. The cost of leadership is sometimes doing things that people don’t want but are best for them long term. The problem with church leadership is that we live in a consumeristic society and you have to break the consumerism mentality that people bring into the church where they think church is there for them. To serve them or as a remuneration for their tithing. It’s not about you; it’s about Jesus and it’s about getting people closer to Jesus which is against our own sinful nature. In short, if you want to grow closer to Jesus you have to be uncomfortable.

  6. I think scars are, in some senses, inevitable. The cost of leadership is sometimes doing things that people don’t want but are best for them long term. The problem with church leadership is that we live in a consumeristic society and you have to break the consumerism mentality that people bring into the church where they think church is there for them. To serve them or as a remuneration for their tithing. It’s not about you; it’s about Jesus and it’s about getting people closer to Jesus which is against our own sinful nature. In short, if you want to grow closer to Jesus you have to be uncomfortable.

  7. I think scars are, in some senses, inevitable. The cost of leadership is sometimes doing things that people don’t want but are best for them long term. The problem with church leadership is that we live in a consumeristic society and you have to break the consumerism mentality that people bring into the church where they think church is there for them. To serve them or as a remuneration for their tithing. It’s not about you; it’s about Jesus and it’s about getting people closer to Jesus which is against our own sinful nature. In short, if you want to grow closer to Jesus you have to be uncomfortable.

  8. I think scars are, in some senses, inevitable. The cost of leadership is sometimes doing things that people don’t want but are best for them long term. The problem with church leadership is that we live in a consumeristic society and you have to break the consumerism mentality that people bring into the church where they think church is there for them. To serve them or as a remuneration for their tithing. It’s not about you; it’s about Jesus and it’s about getting people closer to Jesus which is against our own sinful nature. In short, if you want to grow closer to Jesus you have to be uncomfortable.

  9. Here here. There is a fine line between church leadership as a “calling” and as a “job.” Edges get blurred. If one is not willing to deal with the pains that may come with their calling, perhaps they need to rethink their position.

  10. Here here. There is a fine line between church leadership as a “calling” and as a “job.” Edges get blurred. If one is not willing to deal with the pains that may come with their calling, perhaps they need to rethink their position.

  11. Here here. There is a fine line between church leadership as a “calling” and as a “job.” Edges get blurred. If one is not willing to deal with the pains that may come with their calling, perhaps they need to rethink their position.

  12. Here here. There is a fine line between church leadership as a “calling” and as a “job.” Edges get blurred. If one is not willing to deal with the pains that may come with their calling, perhaps they need to rethink their position.

  13. Thanks for this. Profound. Necessary. I hate pain, but this article makes me want to put on my big girl pants and keep going.
    –b

  14. Thanks for this. Profound. Necessary. I hate pain, but this article makes me want to put on my big girl pants and keep going.
    –b

  15. Thanks for this. Profound. Necessary. I hate pain, but this article makes me want to put on my big girl pants and keep going.
    –b

  16. Thanks for this. Profound. Necessary. I hate pain, but this article makes me want to put on my big girl pants and keep going.
    –b

  17. One Busy Mom.. awesome quote from you!
    “want to put on my big girl pants and keep going:!!! 🙂

  18. One Busy Mom.. awesome quote from you!
    “want to put on my big girl pants and keep going:!!! 🙂

  19. One Busy Mom.. awesome quote from you!
    “want to put on my big girl pants and keep going:!!! 🙂

  20. One Busy Mom.. awesome quote from you!
    “want to put on my big girl pants and keep going:!!! 🙂

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