The gay debate: Are we gonna black list people like the 1950s?!

In the LA Times this Sunday there was an article about the anger from the opponents of Prop 8–the proposition in California that banned marriage of same-sex couples. It seems that many in Hollywood are out to blacklist people who supported the ban. It feels a lot like what the 1950s was when anyone at all connected to someone connected to communism  would be blacklisted from Hollywood. There was a witch hunt then and one being reported today. Beyond the actual disagreements which have to do with traditional values of what marriage is, this concerns me for people of any opinion on Prop 8 or the idea of gay marriage. From the LA Times.

Other targets include Film Independent, the nonprofit arts organization that puts on both the Los Angeles Film Festival and the Spirit Awards; the Cinemark theater chain; and the Sundance Film Festival.

In Film Independent’s case, the board has defended the continued employment of Richard Raddon, the Mormon director of the L.A. Film Festival who donated $1,500 to support Proposition 8. Cinemark is under siege because Chief Executive Alan Stock gave $9,999 to support the same-sex marriage ban. And in a sign of a powerful ripple effect, Sundance, perhaps the American institution that has done the most to support gay filmmakers and gay cinema, is being targeted because it screens films in a Cinemark theater.

For many in Hollywood, the Proposition 8 backlash represents a troubling clash of free speech, religious beliefs and the right to fight intolerance. Many supporters of same-sex marriage view the state constitutional amendment as codified bigotry, a rollback of civil liberties for gays and lesbians.

On the right there has been a kind of blacklisting of another kind. As Christians, we should take stands on morality, but that rings hollow when we do not offer anything but a bullhorn that condemns people. Politics are not the solution or vehicle for real societal change in my opinion.  Churches that remained quiet on this issue were under the heat from the far right.  Churches that were public about their support of Prop 8 were protested by the left.  It seems you could be blacklisted on any side of this debate!

When does differing of beliefs become intolerance and bigotry? How can we tolerate people who vehemently oppose our views?

Share:
Rich Kirkpatrick

Rich Kirkpatrick

Writer, Speaker, and Musician. Rich Kirkpatrick was recently rated #13 of the “Top 75 Religion Bloggers” by Newsmax.com, having also received recognition by Worship Leader Magazine as “Editor’s Choice” for the “Best of the Best” of blogs in 2011, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

12 comments

  1. Rich, insightful post and good questions. I agree with you that politics and legislation aren’t going to bring about any sort of real societal change. When we depend on government for morality, we’ve pretty much given up.
    I think the real issue is the difference between marriage as defined in social contract and Marriage as defined in Scripture. As a Christian, I believe that homosexuality is a sin. Just like adultery, lying, and idolatry. The government doesn’t do much to take away social contracts from people who commit the later sins and I don’t see as big an outcry from the “bullhorn” crowd to do so.

    Offering our beliefs becomes intolerance/bigotry when we decide that there are different “classes” of sin/sinner and we treat those people different.

    In any case, the black list from either side isn’t right. Expected from our society it would seem, but not right.

    Keep the good stuff coming. Peace.

  2. Rich, insightful post and good questions. I agree with you that politics and legislation aren’t going to bring about any sort of real societal change. When we depend on government for morality, we’ve pretty much given up.
    I think the real issue is the difference between marriage as defined in social contract and Marriage as defined in Scripture. As a Christian, I believe that homosexuality is a sin. Just like adultery, lying, and idolatry. The government doesn’t do much to take away social contracts from people who commit the later sins and I don’t see as big an outcry from the “bullhorn” crowd to do so.

    Offering our beliefs becomes intolerance/bigotry when we decide that there are different “classes” of sin/sinner and we treat those people different.

    In any case, the black list from either side isn’t right. Expected from our society it would seem, but not right.

    Keep the good stuff coming. Peace.

  3. Rich, insightful post and good questions. I agree with you that politics and legislation aren’t going to bring about any sort of real societal change. When we depend on government for morality, we’ve pretty much given up.
    I think the real issue is the difference between marriage as defined in social contract and Marriage as defined in Scripture. As a Christian, I believe that homosexuality is a sin. Just like adultery, lying, and idolatry. The government doesn’t do much to take away social contracts from people who commit the later sins and I don’t see as big an outcry from the “bullhorn” crowd to do so.

    Offering our beliefs becomes intolerance/bigotry when we decide that there are different “classes” of sin/sinner and we treat those people different.

    In any case, the black list from either side isn’t right. Expected from our society it would seem, but not right.

    Keep the good stuff coming. Peace.

  4. Rich, insightful post and good questions. I agree with you that politics and legislation aren’t going to bring about any sort of real societal change. When we depend on government for morality, we’ve pretty much given up.
    I think the real issue is the difference between marriage as defined in social contract and Marriage as defined in Scripture. As a Christian, I believe that homosexuality is a sin. Just like adultery, lying, and idolatry. The government doesn’t do much to take away social contracts from people who commit the later sins and I don’t see as big an outcry from the “bullhorn” crowd to do so.

    Offering our beliefs becomes intolerance/bigotry when we decide that there are different “classes” of sin/sinner and we treat those people different.

    In any case, the black list from either side isn’t right. Expected from our society it would seem, but not right.

    Keep the good stuff coming. Peace.

  5. I don’t know what to say about this. It seems strange though that as Christians we are quick to judge those who don’t know Christ. Just a thought.

  6. I don’t know what to say about this. It seems strange though that as Christians we are quick to judge those who don’t know Christ. Just a thought.

  7. I don’t know what to say about this. It seems strange though that as Christians we are quick to judge those who don’t know Christ. Just a thought.

  8. I don’t know what to say about this. It seems strange though that as Christians we are quick to judge those who don’t know Christ. Just a thought.

  9. You raise some good and important questions. As Christians, the best we can do is build relationships in Christ. Instead of spending so much time, energy, money, etc.. trying to legislate righteousness, we should busy ourselves loving people into new ways of being.
    By the way, I love the look of your heading. Very chic!

  10. You raise some good and important questions. As Christians, the best we can do is build relationships in Christ. Instead of spending so much time, energy, money, etc.. trying to legislate righteousness, we should busy ourselves loving people into new ways of being.
    By the way, I love the look of your heading. Very chic!

  11. You raise some good and important questions. As Christians, the best we can do is build relationships in Christ. Instead of spending so much time, energy, money, etc.. trying to legislate righteousness, we should busy ourselves loving people into new ways of being.
    By the way, I love the look of your heading. Very chic!

  12. You raise some good and important questions. As Christians, the best we can do is build relationships in Christ. Instead of spending so much time, energy, money, etc.. trying to legislate righteousness, we should busy ourselves loving people into new ways of being.
    By the way, I love the look of your heading. Very chic!

Leave a Reply